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Mysticdream44

dehydrating eggs

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I was wondering if any of you have ever tried to dehydrate your own eggs? And if so exactly how you did it? how long will they last? I have a dehydrator and am able to get some good farm fresh eggs here at an auction I go to for a good price. I just thought that would be something else that would be good to have on hand since the price of eggs is out of site in the stores.

If this subject has been discussed before then I'm sorry to ask again.

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I have fresh eggs but know how to dry them...

 

crack in a bowl.. scramble up (raw) pour into your furit leather trays.. dehydrate.

 

turning to powder is a pain.

 

http://www.dryit.com/trblshooteggs.html

 

http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/~lrd/fcf160.html

 

http://eggs.stores.yahoo.net/ (interesting directions.. sprayed on to sheets)

 

http://waltonfeed.com/self/eggs.html

 

The yolk is fat and fat goes rencid fairly quickly. Here is a start.

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HSmom   

I think the safety of doing so at home is questionable.

 

It is safe to freeze eggs at home. You may freeze them whole (NOT in the shell) or whites only or yolks only.

 

To freeze egg whites, simply place in an airtight container and freeze.

 

From Stocking Up by Rodale Press

Quote:
If you are packing yolks separately or are packing whole eggs, you will need to stabilize the yolks to that they won't become hard & pasty after thawing. To do this, add 1 teaspoon of salt OR 1 teaspoon of honey to each cup of yolks. Twelve yolks make up 1 cup. Break up the yolks and stir in the salt or honey...

 

If you are packing your eggs whole, you will also need to stabilize them... Add 1 teaspoon of salt OR honey to each cup of whole eggs. There are about 5 whole eggs in 1 cup. Scramble the eggs with the salt or honey before packing and freezing....3 tablespoons equals 1 whole egg...

 

Freeze in usable portions, label whether honey or salt was used and adjust recipe accordingly. Thaw completely before using, but then use quickly.

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halfpint   

We have chickens, and when I looked into dehydrating most places advised that it was not safe.

 

Before the hens molt and stop laying for a while, I'll freeze some eggs in ice cube trays. Trays with large cubes will usually hold one egg, or you can use the small cube trays and separate the whites from the yolks. Once frozen, you can dump them in a freezer safe container, and refill the trays. I've used them for scrambled eggs and general cooking. While they don't taste quite as good as fresh, I still think they're better than the store bought eggs.

 

Dawn

 

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Leah   

I believe the problem with home drying is the length of time the eggs stay at an unsafe temperature. Commercially dried eggs take much less time due to the high temperatures reached.

We hard-cook and then pickle them or we freeze them.

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HSmom   

And don't feel bad about it, MysticDreams! You're asking questions, which is a great way to learn.

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Cat   

Bumping this to the top...

 

:)

 

 

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From what I've learned it is safe if you scramble and cook the eggs before dehydrating them, but then they are not useful in baking. I'm just going to go ahead and order powdered eggs online now that I know of a sale going on :)

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Violet   

That is still not safe to do, even if you cook them. They sit in the "temperature danger zone" too long before they are dried. Eggs are really something a person should not attempt to dry at home in any manner.

 

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Hmmm. I'm not sure what to think now. I found this site that quotes Encyclopedia of Country Living as saying:

 

[/font][/size][/color]Beat very fresh whole eggs thoroughly (use an egg beater or the equivalent). Pour beaten eggs to make a very thin layer (maximum 1/8") on drying surfaces that have been precoated with plastic or foil. In an oven or dryer, dry at about 120 degrees for 24-36 hours. When the egg layer is dry on top and firm all through, peel away the plastic or foil layer, turn the egg layer upside down and dry that side 12-24 hours more. Then break it up and dry it a few more hours. Then turn your dried egg into a powder using a mortar and pestle or a blender. These eggs work fine in baked goods. Make scrambled eggs by combining the powder with an equal amount of water, such as 1/4 c dried egg powder with 1/4 c. water.

 

Which sounds scary to me actually, but doing some googling I'm finding people doing it. The "danger zone" is up to 135...and a dehydrator goes up to 155 so you could just do it at a higher temperate, I guess. I dunno, not condoning it, just curious.

 

Edited by vigilant20

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I'm with Violet on the issue of eggs. There are as many unsafe procedures on the Internet as there are people that love to live risky lives, but just because they exist doesn't mean for the rest of us that playing Russian Roulette is safe and not without hazards.

 

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Violet   

As was said, there are many books and things online that are not safe to follow. Just because someone publishes it doesn't mean that person has food preservation safety training.

The dehydrator may have a temperature of that high, but that doesn't mean the food stays that hot during the drying time. It will cool off and sit in the danger zone. Plus, in some things, like jerky, for instance, you have to have a high enough salt concentration to help control "water activity". You would not be able to salt the eggs enough to have them edible in the end product.

This is survival, so I am a firm believer in sticking with only USDA tested recipes and methods. You will not find drying eggs as part of the USDA tested methods.

Only freezing eggs or making pickled eggs, which must be kept in the fridge. There is no way to safely can pickled eggs. Same thing, you will find a lot of folks online and things in books saying it is fine to can pickled eggs.

 

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HSmom   
Hmmm. I'm not sure what to think now. I found this site that quotes Encyclopedia of Country Living as saying:

 

...

 

Which sounds scary to me actually, but doing some googling I'm finding people doing it. The "danger zone" is up to 135...and a dehydrator goes up to 155 so you could just do it at a higher temperate, I guess. I dunno, not condoning it, just curious.

 

But think about putting a roast or a whole chicken in your oven. You set the oven to 300*F or 350*F, but as soon as the meat hits 140* - 165*F you pull it out and call it done. The temperature of the environment is NOT the same as the temperature of the food in the environment.

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Violet   

I agree, this is Edge material. I still cannot comprehend folks doing something risky knowing it is not safe . What is the point ? You don't care enough about your health and safety, nor the safety of your family any more than this ?

There are plenty of other options in food storage than to do this.

 

 

 

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I freak out about my eggs if I feel like it took me too long to get home from the store....

 

PLEASE don't try to dehyrdate eggs at home, I don't want to read anything about anyone getting sick!

 

There are many reputable places to purchase powdered eggs for long-term storage, on the internet and perhaps around your town. I'm saving up for a big purchase at Honeyville Farms. They've got #10 cans of powdered eggs that are safe! :)

 

I have to agree with Violet's philosophy...we're here for survival, not taking chances with unsafe food... :) And if I'm going to survive, I want a healthy, happy tummy for my family and I in the process! LOL

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