cootie

Reusable lids and gaskets for canning jars...they DO exist!!!

23 posts in this topic

Hi everyone,

 

I don't know if anyone already found these or not, but I have noticed on a couple threads that there is usually a concern about running out of canning lids during a time when no more can be found / bought.

 

I was looking through my Lehman's catalog tonight, and saw German canning jars with reuseable glass lids and rubber gaskets. They send eight steel clamps to hold the lids on during canning either with pressure cooker or water bath canner, and you can reuse the lids and gaskets! They come in sets of four, and the price isn't too terribly bad, considering you can reuse them. I don't have the info in front of me, but I'm sure one can find them easily on the Lehman's website under canning or something like that.

 

Just thought someone could use this info.

 

God Bless,

Cootie

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LOL Cootie, I was perusing that catalog last night and noticed the same thing. These are similar to the old jars that had rubber rings and clamps but these look updated with different types of clamps. I have used the old style ones in the past and they work just fine.

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Musta been something in the air last nite about Lehmans. I was checking their price on the hand-powered grinder base for my Family Grain Grinder. (So far, they still have the best price...but it went up $3.)

 

 

I found these CUTE bitty things too, Stacy. I want them....I don't even have Grdaughters ...yet. I might get Grdaughters! AND these are on sale! laugh

 

http://www.lehmans.com/shopping/product/...iProductID=7550

 

Ooops, sorry bout thread drift.....Now back to the regularly scheduled programing...

---------------

 

 

My friend bought some of those containers from Lehmans but I don't know that she ever has canned in them. shrug

 

 

MtRider [having an illogical delight in miniatures.... ]

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Has anyone tried the Tattler reusable lids???

 

They are sold on ebay and CLAIM that they can be used for pressure canning. Although I am open to this concept (not an approved method) I have been thinking alot about the usage of plastic lids. I think they would be safe enough but what happens when these are heated to 240-250 degrees??? Even if they aren't going to melt, won't they release toxins??

 

Has anyone had experience with these lids?? Or even any technical data? Supposedly the company who produced them was bought out by Kerr.

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Has anyone tried the Tattler reusable lids???

 

They are sold on ebay and CLAIM that they can be used for pressure canning. Although I am open to this concept (not an approved method) I have been thinking alot about the usage of plastic lids. I think they would be safe enough but what happens when these are heated to 240-250 degrees??? Even if they aren't going to melt, won't they release toxins??

 

Has anyone had experience with these lids?? Or even any technical data? Supposedly the company who produced them was bought out by Kerr.

Depends on what type of plastic they are made from. I work at a thermoplastic molder and can tell you that the temperatures they are subjected to during molding is MUCH higher than anything you could recreate in your kitchen. Find out what they're made from and I may be able to help you.

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Depends on what type of plastic they are made from. I work at a thermoplastic molder and can tell you that the temperatures they are subjected to during molding is MUCH higher than anything you could recreate in your kitchen. Find out what they're made from and I may be able to help you.

 

Well I cannot find out what type of plastic they are. The site says they are FDA approved though. So it must be a food grade plastic. They are white lids. Perhaps HDPE??

 

I realize the temps required to mold these plastics are higher than 250 degrees. What I was asking is related to the controversy of whether these plastics leach toxins when exposed to mild heat. I've heard lots of bad media related to bisphenol-a and others leaching into foods.

 

Perhaps you could share your thoughts on whether these rumors even have any basis in fact. Certainly has been something to think about for me. Thanks.

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A lot of controversial "facts" about the plastic leaching issue...so I won't comment on that. I simply haven't found data I'm comfortable with yet. So I dunno.

 

 

But these Tattler lids....zoombies, are they saying that they are FDA approved for putting into a waterbath canner or a pressure canner and actually CANNING with them? Or are they FDA approved for food-safe use and you put them on after you open and begin to use a homecanned jar of something?????? I buy white plastic lids at Walmart for a post-canning lid use. But not for canning with them on. [do you have a website?]

 

 

BTW, Violet and the whole gang over at the Preserving the Harvest forum talk up these canning issues all the time. You can ask there too.

 

 

MtRider [always like the word "reusable" :) ]

Edited by Mt_Rider

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But these Tattler lids....zoombies, are they saying that they are FDA approved for putting into a waterbath canner or a pressure canner and actually CANNING with them?

 

 

 

From what I can tell about these things. The materials they are made of are considered FDA approved. I have found no evidence that these lids are approved for canning.

 

These lids are, however, intended to be used for both pressure and water bath canning, according to the manufacturer.

 

They are basically a plastic version of the standard metal lid, without rubber. They use rubber rings similar to the old style jars for the seal. They are supposed to have a raised center, like metal lids that pull down to indicate a seal.

 

Search for Tattler lids on ebay. Also, there is a discussion on this site: http://www.homesteadingtoday.com/archive/i...p/t-244578.html

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wow these look great. can it be that simple? I imagine over the years of canning, this would be a real money saver. It would also be great to not have to worry about availability if for some reason we could not go to the stores....

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Have you heard of Weck canning jars? I believe their rubber gaskets are reusable. They have glass lids, but I don't think they are the locking kind. And, they're really pretty.

 

http://www.weckcanning.com

Edited by Grace&Violets

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I'm waiting to hear from Violet who has the pulse on the official stance taken on this method. I'd be interested in the Weck jar method too.

 

by zoombies:

From what I can tell about these things. The materials they are made of are considered FDA approved. I have found no evidence that these lids are approved for canning.

 

Meaning the plastic & rubber materials are food-safe. From a look at the various websites talking about these, several people have bounced right over that and THOT they claimed FDA approval for the use of them for canning. Good catch on that, zoobies!

 

 

 

But it WOULD be nice if they were reusable....but for how long?

 

 

 

MtRider [....still not ready for a decision yet..... :shrug: ]

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It the Tattler lids are reuseable and you were worried about the materials in the lid, is it possible to still use them, but make sure that you keep your food below a certain line when filling the jar and never tip the jar so the food touches the top? This coming from someone who hasn't canned, though.

Edited by Grace&Violets

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These are basically the same type of old fashioned glass and rubber seal lids used by our grandmothers (or great grandmothers depending) only made with new materials. I've used my old glass lids and rubber seals (gaskets actually) (you can get them at Amazon and other places)

 

http://www.amazon.com/Rubber-Parfait-Canni...s/dp/B001B6CM94

 

I've only had one fail to seal in years and that was because there was a nick in the gasket I didn't see. I can use them with my regular canning jars with the regular rings or with the old zinc caps I also have. I do NOT use them regularly and usually only with items I wouldn't expect to spoil like pickles and sweetened fruit. I just recently bought some 'new old stock' rubber gaskets at a flea market for a dollar a box. They are in perfect condition, not hardened (you have to watch for that in the old gaskets) and have added them to my 'just in case' supply. The rest of my stash consists of several sleeves of flats (144 each) that we bought from an Amish hardware store very reasonably.

 

If these ARE FDA approved for CANNING I would get some and use them. It really doesn't say that in either of the web sites does it? If things really got bad and I couldn't get flats I would probably try to dehydrate, root cellar, or otherwise store most of my food. I would also use my old fashioned canning jar seals but most likely only as I do now, very cautiously.

 

Great links, hope they can be proven safe to can with.

:bighug2:

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I really don't see any benefit in them. If you look at what it says to remove them it says " possible reuse" for those rubber rings. Besides, they cost as much as a box of regular canning lids. What is the benefit in having a stack of plastic lids that you still have to buy rubber rings for that cost as much as Ball, Kerr, etc. ? These are not USDA approved.

So, you have to buy a ton of plastic lids that are expensive and then rubber rings ??

I am also not pleased with them saying you can use them for " open kettle" !!

We all know open kettle is no processing at all.

I suggest you find a good sale on Ball, Kerr, or Golden Harvest lids, of if you are fortunate to live near some Amish or Mennonites and get a good deal, then stock up on them instead. The shelf life of lids is about 5 to 7 years.

 

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Not to veer off into canning methods but..... Can someone tell me [& others] the difference between the terms "water bath" and "open-kettle" :shrug:

 

This is usually more a topic for other forums like Preserving Harvest BUT.....it applies here due to the possible chance to stock up on a reusable product. So it does fit down here in RURR as well.

 

 

I did find it a bit misleading for them to talk about FDA-approval (for the materials) when they could have more simply said that materials are "food-safe" for containing food. [...to which I have to say....well, duh! You'd hope so.] ....Meaning that it is an unnecessary statement that I can only think might be to be a bid for this misunderstanding. I don't like deceit in advertising and this..... :shrug:

 

 

 

MtRider [....5-7 yrs on the Kerr/Ball lids....that's good to know....thanks Violet. ]

Edited by Mt_Rider

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I know that the rubber rings I have were considered multiple use gaskets and if they were used with the old fashioned glass flats they too were reused again and again. The same was true of the rubber gaskets and the old bail top jars.

 

The only study I have ever seen is a very old one that was done by the Canning company when they first came out with their "new" disposable flats and they wanted to SELL them as they could make more money on them than on the old fashioned reusable canning jars and seals.

 

Violet, have you see any recent studies that say these old jars and gaskets are not safe to use?

 

This advertising DOES seem misleading but is it because they haven't got the money to do the studies required by the FDA before they can make claims or because their studies didn't prove their product safe? You can patent anything that hasn't been patented before but you can't legally make claims that haven't been proven to the satisfaction of the government. That protection is meant for people's safety but sometimes I believe it's also tied up in MONEY. Just like a ton of other "approved" products that have proven unsafe in the long run.

 

We have to be very careful not to believe all the claims out there. ALL claims, especially those that got approval simply because they had enough money or clout to get it.

 

Hopefully someone will be able to come up with some better information about these canning lids than what the seller is trying to convince us of. I hope they ARE reusable. I agree with Violet that we should stock up on canning flats but they would only last just so long in a TEOTWAWKI situation and the ability to reuse those items for at least an extended period of time would be a blessing.

:bighug2:

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Not to veer off into canning methods but..... Can someone tell me [& others] the difference between the terms "water bath" and "open-kettle" :shrug:

"Open Kettle" is regular cooking of the food (in an open pot) and then pouring in to a jar, putting the lid on and then allowing the heat differential seal the lid. There is no "pasteurization" to kill bacteria spores to prevent spoilage.

 

Canning is the actual process of "pasteurization", whether it is by a Boiling Water Canner (high-acid foods) or a pressure canner (low-acid foods), that is required to kill the bacterias and toxins and then create a true vacuum seal of the contents so it can be stored at room temperature without spoilage.

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Thanks Violet. I'll post it here for others.

 

"Equipment and Methods Not RecommendedOpen-kettle canning and the processing of freshly filled jars in conventional ovens, microwave ovens, and dishwashers are not recommended, because these practices do not prevent all risks of spoilage. Steam canners are not recommended because processing times for use with current models have not been adequately researched. Because steam canners do not heat foods in the same manner as boiling-water canners, their use with boiling-water process times may result in spoilage. It is not recommended that pressure processes in excess of 15 PSI be applied when using new pressure canning equipment. So-called canning powders are useless as preservatives and do not replace the need for proper heat processing. Jars with wire bails and glass caps make attractive antiques or storage containers for dry food ingredients but are not recommended for use in canning. One-piece zinc porcelain-lined caps are also no longer recommended. Both glass and zinc caps use flat rubber rings for sealing jars, but too often fail to seal properly."

It doesn't site a specific study though and it doesn't say if the food is unsafe in 'properly sealed' jars. Hmmmm...Almost as decieving as some of the advertisements.

:bighug2:

 

 

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"Open Kettle" is regular cooking of the food (in an open pot) and then pouring in to a jar, putting the lid on and then allowing the heat differential seal the lid. There is no "pasteurization" to kill bacteria spores to prevent spoilage.

 

Canning is the actual process of "pasteurization", whether it is by a Boiling Water Canner (high-acid foods) or a pressure canner (low-acid foods), that is required to kill the bacterias and toxins and then create a true vacuum seal of the contents so it can be stored at room temperature without spoilage.

 

Ah yes....I remember now. Thanks Canning Nerd!

 

 

MtRider :canning:

Edited by Mt_Rider

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