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Crazy4Canning

Using peach pits & peelings? Anyone?

14 posts in this topic

Am I correct in thinking that the ONLY thing peach pits and peelings are for (other than trying to sprout a new tree) is the compost?

 

I thought I remember someone telling me once that you could toss everything in a pot, add water and simmer....and make jam or jelly from the leavings. Or was that apple cores/ peelings?

 

I ask because my brain is befuddled in this 100 degree heat we've had now for 3 days.

 

I am at the end of a box of peaches now...and even the words on the BBB look funny to me. sassing

 

I think I need a bath there are peach parts and leavings EVERYWHERE...

 

Tomorrow - dill & sweet pickles. Looks like I'm getting up early!

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http://plantanswers.tamu.edu/fruit/peach.html

 

Q: Are peach pits poisonous?

 

A: All parts of the peach except the fruit pulp and skin are toxic. These parts contain cyanide-producing substances. Symptoms - difficulty in breathing, coma; may be fatal.

 

 

 

Someone should remove that peach pit recipe from this forum.

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I know...my grandma used to make it that way too. But....I wouldn't risk it. You'd have to actually consume a LOT of peach pits to get sick...but they do make dogs pretty sick if they crunch them like snack treats.

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My mom used to dry out apricot and peach pits (in sun, all summer long)...then she'd store them in old cereal boxes (like cheerios)...and in the winter, she'd use the box and all as her "kindling" for the fire in her cast-iron woodstove. As I recall, they burned hot and fast.

 

Peelings were composted. I didn't know they were toxic too. But it didn't seem to hurt us. Or if it did, we didn't notice.

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Crazy, it is fine to use the pits and peels from peaches as long as the pits are not cracked. That is when the toxins can be released.

I know, it is HOT here !!!

I am busy cooking for company tomorrow. At least I have a/c.

If I had not been so busy I would have told you to bring your things over and can here where it is cool enough.

 

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Thanks for the sweet offer, Violet. Enjoy your company!

 

Thanks for the advice everyone. I too, remember hearing about the peach pit thread but missed it. Thanks for re-posting.

 

I am just now getting started with the canning and it is about 2:30 pm. My DH promised some friends that he and I would show up and help them move for a short while....after a shower and drinking a gallon of water, I'm off to do yet ANOTHER BOX of peaches. Maybe I might just get the dill pickles started today. Who knows.

 

My DH is telling me now that APPLE SEEDS are also full of cyanide. Is this true????

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Yes, apple seeds are poison.... check this out

 

http://chemistry.about.com/b/2007/09/12/ye...e-poisonous.htm

 

Yes, Apple Seeds and Cherry Pits are Poisonous

Wednesday September 12, 2007

 

In fact, if you eat enough apple seeds or cherry pits, you could die. Apple seeds contain cyanogenic acids. Cherry pits, and seeds from related fruits, including peaches, plums, almonds, pears, and apricots, contain cyanogenic glycosides. Your body can detoxify small quantities of cyanide compounds. If you accidentally eat a cherry pit in a pie or swallow an apple seed or two, you'll be fine. Actually, if you swallow several seeds whole, you would absorb a minimal amount of the toxic compounds. Chewing the seeds makes them much more hazardous to your health. Children and pets are much more likely to suffer poisoning from eating the seeds than adults.

 

Symptoms of mild poisoning include headache, dizziness, confusion, anxiety, and vomiting. Larger doses can lead to difficulty breathing, increased blood pressure and heart rate, and kidney failure. Reactions can include coma, convulsions, and death from respiratory arrest. There are several treatment options, but the main thing is to limit the absorption of the chemicals from the seeds. Basically, this means it's important to seek immediate medical attention if a child or pet is known to have eaten several seeds. Usually, the plan of action is to pump the stomach or induce vomiting. Antidotes are available, but they are somewhat controversial. If you or someone you know eats a seed or two, don't worry... as I said, your body is well-equipped to detoxify small quantities of cyanide compounds. They naturally occur in several foods. However, if you were wondering whether or not it's true that the seeds and pits are toxic and potentially lethal... yes, apple seeds and cherry pits are poisonous.

 

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You can make vinegar (easy!) from the peelings... http://purecajunsunshine.blogspot.com/2007...n-and-easy.html

 

...and nice bedwarmers from the peach pits...I mentioned in another thread somewhere, but in case you didn't see it...

 

...in the old days, bedwarmers were made of cherry pits in a cloth sack, and warmed by the fire or near the woodstove. Before going to bed, the hot sacks were slipped between the sheets drive off the cold winter chill. Instead of being warmed near a fire, a newfangled bedwarmer probably would get a quick run in the microwave!

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Now I am seeing we should just say to use the peels, not the pits. So, you all have to decide for yourself if you want to risk using the pits.

Guess if I were going to do it nowdays I would just use the peels.

The website to the Colorado state info is now gone. At least I sure can't seem to get it to come up.

 

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Put peach and nectarine peels and seeds into a bottle with some armanac (or other alcohol) and sugar, throw in a few alspice berries and peppercorns, and then wait a year or so (store in a cool, dark place). Then strain through a coffee filter and add a bit of glycerine for a smooth and delicious cordial.

 

(Another nice recipe is rose petals, sugar, and raspberries in tequila.)

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I often use the peelings of fruit to make cordials but have never used the pits. I'm wondering if the alcohol would hasten the leaching of the toxins in the pits. Be interesting to see if any commercial cordials are made with the pits and of what fruit. I know that whole sweet cherries are preserved in alcohol. The pits aren't eaten however.

 

Are peach pits related to the bitter almond pit from which Laetrile (sometimes called B17) is derived? That product is a controversial cancer treatment.

 

Interesting subject.

:bighug2:

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