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michelle

Growing beans from store

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michelle   

Alright I know I've seen talk about growing beans from the store. I have some black beans, great northern beans, kidney beans, split peas, and lentils I'd like to try to grow. Can all these be grown using that method? I am thinking about picking up a bag of 16 bean soup to grow too if possible. How do you start beans like this to grow? Plant them in the ground, start indoors and transplant, soak in paper towels before planting? What is the best method for growing beans from the store? Is there anything I should know to do or not do before I start this experiment?

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Leah   

I know that black beans, great northern beans, kidney beans, and lentils will all sprout.

We've grown all sorts of dry beans right from the store. I like to soak them for a few hours and sprout them in a jar with a wet paper towel, before planting them.

 

I assume the split peas won't work very well, if at all.

 

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michelle   

Great. Thanks Leah! I was wondering about that. I will soak them to sprout before planting. Thanks!

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Cat   

You don't *have* to soak them, but then, you're in a warmer state than I am. If the soil is warmed up and ready to plant, soaking might will give the plants a head start. That said, if they get too wet for a long time, they can rot.

 

Up here in Indiana, I don't soak them unless the soil is warmed, and if I'm already kind of late planting them. Otherwise, they'll "take their cues" from the soil conditions and sprout when it's right for them... warm and damp enough, and I think that's best (unless I'm late).

 

I don't know what variety of peas "split peas" are usually processed from. scratchhead.gif

 

If you use the soup-mix beans, be sure to plant them in like groups or rows... not all mixed up. I'm not sure if having them too close would mess up the pollination of each variety.

 

Beans are planted right in the ground. This site seems clear... and the only difference between "green beans" and dried beans is when you pick 'em. http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/extensi...greenbeans.html

 

 

 

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michelle   

Thanks. I want to try planting some beans for us and using the store bought beans will be much cheaper. I do have seeds to plant for some beans but wanted to plant some of the ones I can buy at the store and haven't found in seeds yet. Thanks!

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I have heard you can soak your beans overnight in tea. Don't remember why, but it is supposed top help. I remember when I first [planted pinto beans from the store. My dad said they would never grow and if they did they would never produce. Well they did both. It is always possible to actually teach your parents. LOL. This year I am going to try to plant wheat berries that a friend gave me. I plan on using it for a cover crop in the fall. We'll see.

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I planted the black beans that I usually use in chili last summer. They grew well though I was disappointed. They were a bush variety, not a climbing one and they weren't very good as green beans. I didn't bother to let them dry. It is good to know that they do work!

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Cat   

I'm guessing most dried beans that are sold in the store are from the bush variety. Climbing beans would be more difficult to grow in fields and more difficult to harvest. Bush beans grow more compactly and are more easily machine-harvested.

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WOW I didn't know you could do this!!! black beans are a favorite here at casa de deerslayer I have been looking everywhere for some to plant!!! YIPPEE :darlenedance:

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I'm guessing most dried beans that are sold in the store are from the bush variety. Climbing beans would be more difficult to grow in fields and more difficult to harvest. Bush beans grow more compactly and are more easily machine-harvested.

 

Good point, Cat! I just didn't think it through, I guess. I did harvest a lot of my purple beans for seed because it was really hard to keep up with them this year. We had a bumper crop. I have a full quart jar of those and would definitely put them all in the ground if the :smiley_shitfan: .

I've been growing them for years and they don't seem to be bothered by pests. They grow quickly and produce right into the fall. I would probably plant them along my fences for support using just a garden hoe.

 

I have a few other types of beans that I want to try this year. I may just try a few of them in pots inside the greenhouse to see how they do.

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Cat   

I love the purple beans! They have such a beautiful green color when cooked.

 

And they're a lot easier for kids to find for picking.

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WormGuy   

I went through over a hundred post looking for this. I couldn't find it and I did a web search and this post came up in the fourth slot. Ya never know where we can have an influence. I'm going to plant some great northern and pinto beans this year, I hope to get a good crop of dried ones.

 

 

 

:wormie2:

John

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Annarchy   

WormGuy, I planted black eyed peas and pinto beans from the store last year. The were bush type and grew really well. Each plant produced about 8-10 pods before my poor soil and the heat withered them.

 

Let us know how it goes.

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I think that they'll do well, too! When you think about it, a single pound of beans can be had (even at the dollar store) for $1 or less. One pound is a whole lotta seed that you can either cook and eat or plant and reap. Pretty good deal all around...It makes your beans a dual purpose prep item.

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Where are you shopping, that you can get beans for less than a dollar a pound? On sale they're still over a buck here.

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Really, Amber? I usually buy mine at the regular grocery store (on sale) for around 89 cents to $1 a lb. At Dollar Tree, they routinely carry one lb bags of beans for a dollar. I haven't bought any lately but I routinely check the prices. I use the dried bean prices as a barometer. It is comforting to have a mental list of things that I can stock up on even when money is tight. Even the frou-frou university branded store sells 1 lb packs of beans for 1.29 a lb.

 

I tend to only price the types that I use so that would be black beans, whole green lentils and split red lentils. I've also gotten bags of barley, though I haven't used any of it yet.

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I was at Aldi's last night and found that they had navy beans and either black eyed peas or pintos for around $1 a pound. They are sold in 2 lb bags, though. I didn't buy any as we aren't huge bean eaters. I just like to have some on hand for certain recipes. I don't use any of those varieties though.

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