A mother a survivor

Classico Spaghetti jars for canning?

24 posts in this topic

I've been reading the nchfp site, and it looks like spaghetti jars that will accept a two piece lid CAN be used for water bath canning (not pressure canned.)

 

Has anyone used the Classico Atlas jars? They accept the two piece lid, and the top is smooth like the ball jars. According to the Classico website:

 

Can I reuse the Classico® jar for home canning?

No. A coating is applied at the glass plant to reduce scratching and scuffing. If scratched, the jar becomes weaker at this point and can more easily break. This would increase the risk of the jar breaking when used for canning. Also, the lighter weight of our current jar could make it unsafe for home canning.

 

I don't know if I really believe this, because I know companies like to cover their rear from problems/lawsuits. I've used these jars for drinking glasses, and our dishwasher gets steaming hot-I've never had one break. Anyone ever use these jars with success?

Edited by A mother a survivor

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They are not the same as a regular canning jar. The sealing surface on those types of jars are more rounded, not as flat. That leaves less of a sealing surface area for the compound to seal upon.

They glass is often thinner. Think about it, are they going to use an expensive glass in a jar that is meant to be thrown away ? We call those kinds of jars "one trip" jars.

You can get by with them in a BWB, but never use in a pressure canner. Just know that you should expect more breakage from those kinds of jars as opposed to one that is specially designed for canning.

They can also come unsealed more easily due to the smaller sealing surface area.

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They are not the same as a regular canning jar. The sealing surface on those types of jars are more rounded, not as flat. That leaves less of a sealing surface area for the compound to seal upon.

They glass is often thinner. Think about it, are they going to use an expensive glass in a jar that is meant to be thrown away ? We call those kinds of jars "one trip" jars.

You can get by with them in a BWB, but never use in a pressure canner. Just know that you should expect more breakage from those kinds of jars as opposed to one that is specially designed for canning.

They can also come unsealed more easily due to the smaller sealing surface area.

 

 

Violet, aside from the increased chance of potential breakage/seal failure, they technically would be safe for water bathing correct? I am not planning on using the jars as my "primary" method of canning, but if TSHTF it would be nice to have the extra jars.

 

Thank you! I'm sorry I have so many questions... (we have about 100 classico jars) :)

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I use the Classico for vacuum sealing dehydrated foods. I think the Ragu jars will accept the dome lids, as least I hope so as I have 90 of the suckers! :D

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Okay... don't throw tomatoes at me, but I have a little trick that you may be interested in Mother of a Survivor. I have been canning for close to 20 years now, and I have always reused my jelly jars (and the like) along with their original lid. I know, I know... gasp! That is a canning no-no; however; this is a secret my mil taught me and she was doing it years before I ever married into the family. She was raised by parents who lived through the depression so she was brought up very, very frugally. Perhaps her mother taught her this???? Anyway, neither one of us has ever had a problem reusing the jars or the original lids. I mainly reuse my jars/lids for canning tomatoes and pancake syrup though.

 

The original seal is strong enough to be used twice, but like Violet mentioned, you can only use these types of jars (jelly, spaghetti, salsa, etc.) in a water bath. I would never try this in a pressure canner.

 

If you choose to re-use the salsa jars, you need to make sure the salsa/onion smell has been completely removed from the lid or your new food will absorb the flavor.

 

HTH,

Kelly

 

ETA: I just wanted to clarify that you can only reuse the original lids once. I would not chance more than that.

Edited by Insurance

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smileyvault-tomatoes.gif

 

 

Some people have said they might can clean water with these, but again, any smell leftover in the lid sealant will taint the water.

 

 

 

:behindsofa:

 

 

We had neighbors when I was a kid who re-used the old baby food jars for jellies over & over again. My Mom about had a *fit*, but they figured if it unsealed, it was only a bit of jelly lost, and they swore they were fine!

 

:yuk:

 

 

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I save all my jars and their lids. I don't use them now because I have plenty of canning jars.BUT if tshtf we will probably be using any jars we can get if we have anything to put in them.

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Okay - confession!

 

I was using a friend's kitchen this summer for canning my pears (my oven rheostat died!) and ran out of jars. She had 2 or 3 classico jars on hand so I checked them for nicks and made sure a ring fit them snuggly. They did work. I was only doing a boiling water bath can, but I was grateful to have them. These are also at the front of the line to be eaten first. (I just finished pears from 2 years ago!) All the remaining 4 dozen were done with Kerr/Ball/ Golden Harvest.

 

I hated to use them, but I was desperate and they did work. They have held a seal and I didn't want to waste over a dozen pears.

 

Violet is right. They are NOT safe for pressure canning. As food safety advisors, we have to let you know of the hazards, then let you make up your own mind. :)

 

Regarding the use of store-bought jelly jars & lids, we did this all the time as a kid. Now, I know better and won't do it AT ALL. I remember mold growing on the top of jars and my dad telling me it was 'fine', just scrape it off. Hence, why I'm so vigilant now about mold and proper canning procedure and process.

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Regarding the use of store-bought jelly jars & lids, we did this all the time as a kid. Now, I know better and won't do it AT ALL. I remember mold growing on the top of jars and my dad telling me it was 'fine', just scrape it off. Hence, why I'm so vigilant now about mold and proper canning procedure and process.

 

Sometimes what looks like mold is actually acid build up ~ like when you are canning tomatoes.

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Acid build up when canning tomatoes? That's interesting since tomatoes are not very acidic. What does it look like?

 

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Acid build up when canning tomatoes? That's interesting since tomatoes are not very acidic. What does it look like?

 

Yes, tomatoes are considered to be acidic and some people have a hard time with indigestion after eating them ~ tomato sauce too, as well as other products that contain tomatoes. Yellow tomatoes are considered to be the lowest in acidity.

 

The acid build up looks just like mold. Kind of a darkish gray/black color; it will usually just be a tiny small spot or two. I think you really have to go by the smell and color of your canned goods to determine whether it is mold or not. The acid build up will not be foul smelling nor will it discolor your food.

 

ETA: I wanted to add too that acid build up does not happen all that often ~ I've only seen this twice all the years I have been canning. The build up will be directly on the lid and not on your food. If someone is regularly having problems with "mold" or "acid build up" then they need to re-evaluate their sterilizing procedures.

Edited by Insurance

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Interesting because the USDA and National Center for Home Food Preservation have not considered tomatoes to be very acidic for years and has required that bottled lemon juice be added to recipes to bring them "over the line" as a safety precaution.

 

And, sorry, I've never heard of "acid build up" and I would love some reference I could go to about it. As for "mold", NOBODY should be experiencing that if they are canning their foods properly.

 

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I agree with Canned Nerd about this.

I teach food preservation safety and this is not a part of our curriculum, about acid build up .

Perhaps you are not following current, safe guidelines. Any information that is not current should not be used in home canning.

 

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Interesting because the USDA and National Center for Home Food Preservation have not considered tomatoes to be very acidic for years and has required that bottled lemon juice be added to recipes to bring them "over the line" as a safety precaution.

 

And, sorry, I've never heard of "acid build up" and I would love some reference I could go to about it. As for "mold", NOBODY should be experiencing that if they are canning their foods properly.

 

Well, I did a quick search on the Internet and did not come up with anything regarding acid build up; however, my information is coming from an ancient Ball canning book. So that may be the answer. I have never added lemon juice to my tomatoes ~ only salt. I myself have never experience this. I have only heard my mil mention it and then a friend of mine had it on one of her jars. And like I said in my previous post, anyone that is having problems with mold needs to re-evaluate their sterilzing procedures.

 

I love the old canning books ~ there is quite a bit of information in them that are not in the current canning books. I also agree that older canning methods should probably be avoided, but on the other hand, if it worked for years and years before (and no one got sick or died from them) they should still be safe today. Sorry for opening a can of worms. Pun intended.

 

I'm sorry Mother A Survivor. This thread has steered way off course. I promise to hush now.

 

ETA: I lied. It is not a Ball book ~ it's Kerr.

Edited by Insurance

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Insurance,

 

I too, have never heard of this acid build up. Sounds like a mold to me. If you're citing and going by an OLD, OLD, really old blue book, please don't. NEW current Ball Blue Books are VERY affordable and should be a apart of every canner's library.

 

I love the old books myself but they are full of inaccurate information by today's modern standards.

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I'm gonna throw in my 2-cents' worth and maybe it'll help...?

 

The old-time method of preserving jellies consisted of pouring the jellies into the jars and then pouring wax/paraffin in a quarter-to-a-half inch thick on top, which would effectively seal the top of the jelly. Then you'd put a metal "non-screw-type" lid on to keep dust out. They were stored in a cool, dark basement.

 

The sugar content would keep it well enough. But still, sometimes mold would grow in small air pockets under the wax. Because the mold was a type with small "roots", you could take off the wax, scoop off the mold, wipe the rim, and go ahead and use it.

 

This was *the* way to do jellies and jams for years and years, but of course we know better today. Lid-sealed is best.

 

 

And about the tomatoes...

 

This is what I've learned from my Amish relatives, and the Amish tend to rely a lot on what many of us would call "superstition". :blush:

 

It is said that women who are pregnant or having their "period" should not can tomatoes because there are "acids" in the skin (chemical changes from the hormones) that will "clot" the tomatoes (here they compare these clots in an unappetizing way to other stuff). I have seen what they refer to, and I have no idea what causes it. The very tops of tomato juices will have a thick, darker substance floating in it.

 

It doesn't affect the tomato taste or useage, but of course being compared to other stuff makes it something *they* don't want to use. :yuk:

 

So they'll have friends or even (shhh) husbands actually handle the tomatoes, and they'll do everything that doesn't require actually touching it.

 

I do know that when I was pregnant the first time I had some of it in my tomatoes, but not enough to get crazy about. Mom was more worried about it than I was.

 

ANYWAY... I suspect this is what is was referred to above, and *no* Canned Nerd, you probably have never experienced it... :happy0203:

 

 

:24:

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Insurance,

 

 

If you're citing and going by an OLD, OLD, really old blue book, please don't. NEW current Ball Blue Books are VERY affordable and should be a apart of every canner's library.

 

Obviously I have not communicated my thoughts very well. Rest assured.... I'm only citing ~ not using.

Edited by Insurance

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Any time the subject of old preserving recipes comes up, someone mentions to watch out for outdated methods. I'm sure no one was speaking personally, Darlene likes us to keep mentioning it, as many folks come to us who have never canned anything before.

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PS That's over three thousand jars...BWB and pressure canned....and only two didn't seal and only one has ever broken.

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Susie, since you're in France... have you ever been able to find the same kinds of jars and lids we have in the US, or are they impossible to find?

 

And do they sell the "new" lids for supermarket jars, instead? Or how do you get those?

 

THANKS!

 

:bighug2:

 

 

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Ummm....have I been gone so long, that I've forgotten how the jars in the US are?

 

Come to think of it....maybe the mayonnais jar lids in America are deeper than the ones here. More 'screw'.

 

But on the link from Whitecap, they have zillions of lids...plastic, metal, screw on, snap on, whatever. They have a European link and North American one, so I think that it's mostly the size that differs, rather than the type. Metric and Imperial differences.

 

My packaging supplier also has jars and lids and rubber rings for the special canning jars, including the really old-fashioned ones that use a thin rubber ring and a metal clip.

 

The difference between the special canning jars and the industrial ones here is that the special ones have teensy tiny ridges along the tops of the jars and need lids that have a soft red compound where the seal joins....which is probably why they can't be re-used as the seal molds into the ridges. The industrial ones are smooth along the top, and the plastic stuff on the inside of the lid is white and not so soft. Who knows? Without the ridges, maybe they can be reused (although I don't, except for when oven canning dehydrated food to vacuum seal the jars).

 

I get my new lids from a wholesale packaging supplier. They are SO much cheaper than the special canning ones....200 for eleven euos instead of twelve for five fifty. It makes canning worthwhile.

 

I spent time with a local pork butcher...she makes and sells paté and other products...and she showed me that the differences between both types of jars don't make any difference. She does sell her products in the special canning jars, too, but only because people who buy them do so because they are reminded of the grandmoter's home canning, and not because of any safety issues.

 

The special canning jars we have over here are made by Famila Weiss, and come in metal lidded or in rubber gasket types. The rubber gaskets are cheaper than the metal lids, but they seem tpo be slowly being phased out, and are found less and less in supermarkets. I find that therubber gaskets get dry and crumbly after a time, and also that the metal topped ones don't always last long, either...and don't have a safety seal that 'pings', whereas the industrial lids I buy do.

 

It is true that the special canning jars are thicker, but that doesn't seem to stop them breaking and also chipping at the rims. Plus they are way too expensive, and hardly ever found in my recycle bin trips, and all the grannies in France seem to have thrown out their old jars, so I hardly ever see them just lying about and available.

 

Have you got a picture of an American jar that you can post? Between us, parhaps we can find a new (cheap) lid to fit on it.

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