Midnightmom

Get Ready to Feel the Heat of the Drought—In Your Wallet.

26 posts in this topic

Please ignore the enviornmental political-correctness at the end of the article. :shakinghead:

Posted as a "warning" of rising food prices...............as if you didn't already know. :blink:

 

Prices for corn—the base of the American food pyramid—and soybeans are already starting to rise.............

 

As TakePart reported earlier this week, the worst U.S. drought in decades might cost the economy more than $50 billion.

 

Reuters backed up this conclusion saying that, “Oppressive heat and a worsening drought in the Midwest pushed grain prices near or past records on Wednesday as crops wilted, cities baked and concerns grew about food and fuel price inflation in the world's top food exporter.”

 

They went on to note that Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said “rising grain prices would mean meat and poultry prices will be higher this year and next, although the inflation may be delayed as farmers start culling their herds due to high feed prices and meat supplies stay adequate.”

 

Climate Central confirmed the worst of Vilsack’s fears saying, “The U.S. is currently in the grips of its worst drought since 1956, with little hope for near-term, widespread drought relief in sight. The drought is having major impacts on agriculture, particularly this year's corn harvest, which is expected to come in significantly lower than initial expectations."

 

But how could the cost implications of the drought rise so quickly?

 

Time says that’s why “They call drought the slow motion disaster . . . While earthquakes and volcanoes strike in a moment, and hurricanes unfold over a few days, a drought is simply a day without rain that becomes two days without rain…and then a week…and then a month and then longer. The damage worsens by the hour, but it can take weeks or even months before the effects of drought become visible in cracked soil, stunted crops and dried up lakes. Even then, there’s none of the explosive drama that marks other natural disasters.”

 

The magazine also observed that “Corn is already above $7 a bushel, and soybeans—another major staple crop used for animal feed and fuel—aren’t far behind . . . Corn is the base of the American food pyramid, used in everything from meat—corn is a staple grain for chickens and cattle—to cereal to even Gatorade and Ring Dings.”

 

As if all that wasn't sobering enough, when The New York Times asked “Richard Seager, who analyzed historical records and climate model projections for the Southwest for the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University, if a perpetual drought was possible there, he replied: ‘You can’t really call it a drought because that implies a temporary change. The models show a progressive aridification. You don’t say, ‘The Sahara is in drought.’ It’s a desert. If the models are right, then the Southwest will face a permanent drying out.’”

 

Oh, and there's one more bit of bad news.

 

On Tuesday, Think Progress said, “While it has been hotter than the 1930s in many places in this country, the drought hasn’t been quite as bad as the worst of the original Dust Bowl. But if we don’t act soon to slash greenhouse gas emissions, we are on our way to far worse as climate change fuels more frequent and more extreme droughts across the U.S.”

 

And that, my friends, will be a true slow-motion disaster.

 

http://www.takepart.com/article/2012/07/19/get-ready-feel-heat-drought--your-wallet

Edited by Midnightmom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am afraid to see how high prices will go, I try to see what I can get now while it's available and we can afford it.

Edited by lumabean

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess it's time to free range some hens and ramp up my gardening.

Actually, I was in a grocery store the other day and noticed how high a price they wanted for beef, I thought perhaps it was just the store. I have become a coupon queen, but have noticed the coupons aren't so good as they were in the past.

I really feel for people who live in housing where they can't garden or have small farm animals.

Edited by rainygardener

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As much as we can prepare, I think we'll always be short of where we want to be...(we being me and Mtn.Mn). I'm glad I've stocked up on a generous amount of seed packets, especially corn! They're safely in my deep freeze. Some are heirloom and some are not. Also stocked up on alot of canned meats, vegetables and fruits. Like most city dwellers, farm animals are not much of an option...except rabbits (which we do plan to obtain this spring...???) for butchering. Will use our live trap and rifles for wild game as long as it lasts. Got a feeling most deer etc., will be hard to find when everybody is combing the woods for them! Probably won't even find "road kill" :laughkick: . Like everybody here, I've been astounded at the rise in prices this past year alone. This past summer our electricity alone was 3x's what it had been. It's gone back down so not sure if it was those "estimated" bills they sent out because their readers were lazy, if my complaint was heard, or both! The closer this "cliff" stuff looms the more I am sure that we'll see store shelves either scarcely stocked or priced so high many can't afford to buy. When Hostess went toes up we lost one of two discount bread stores. We personally don't eat alot of bread and I often bake what we do eat, it's nice to go to the bread store if I want to. The one left is a good one though...buy $5 worth of bread and you get one item of bread free, $10 you get two, $15 you get 3 etc., up to $30 you get 5. Even our local Aldi's prices have gone up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a friend who works in a supermarket as a cashier. She tells me that the store will price match a competitors add. The problem is that if too many customers come in with a competitors add, her store will pull the desired product off of the shelves. We were specifically talking about toilet tissue, but surely it would happen too with food products. Her store will also NOT issue rain checks. I can't say that I was surprised. She said people are flocking into the store for ANY sale at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I heard if there isn't rain this spring 200 miles of the Mississippi River will close down. It will be too shallow for the barges. That will cause prices to rise too if it happens.

 

I had the local radio on while I was canning today and the guy said he made a quick stop in the Dollar Store to get balloons for his daughters birthday. He said the place was so packed they had to close one of the aisles. Not sure what he meant? He said there were over 35 people in the checkout line ahead of him. One guy spent over $145.00. At the dollar store that means 145 items. He didn't say what the items were. He said it gave him a strange feeling. You could tell he was really surprised at what he saw.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I heard if there isn't rain this spring 200 miles of the Mississippi River will close down. It will be too shallow for the barges. That will cause prices to rise too if it happens.

 

I had the local radio on while I was canning today and the guy said he made a quick stop in the Dollar Store to get balloons for his daughters birthday. He said the place was so packed they had to close one of the aisles. Not sure what he meant? He said there were over 35 people in the checkout line ahead of him. One guy spent over $145.00. At the dollar store that means 145 items. He didn't say what the items were. He said it gave him a strange feeling. You could tell he was really surprised at what he saw.

 

I wonder if it will be the same stretch of the Mississippi where they had the problems THIS year?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know if it is the same stretch or not but I just read more and they are talking about by Jan. now, not next spring.

 

Dec. 11th.

http://www.enstarz.com/articles/10377/20121211/mississippi-river-shut-down-cost-100-billion.htm

 

And this one Dec. 9th.

http://www.visaliatimesdelta.com/usatoday/article/1757367?odyssey=mod%7Cnewswell%7Ctext%7CFrontpage%7Cs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We started feeling the heat earlier this fall when it was announced that most mid west farmers had lost their crops. Prices jumped 30 cents in a week on pork and chicken. Beef didn't jump as bad because the government bought a lot of it up.

 

Gas prices went up, when we left NC at the end of September it was 3.83 a gallon and climbing.

 

I have changed my buying strategies I am buying only what is on sale and working meals around what I can get. I hope and pray that I have a good harvest from the backyard garden I plan. It is going to be square foot, raised bed, and container gardening this year I have a small back yard that I have to share with 100 pound black lab.

 

It is sad to say but I think this maybe the new norm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

$10/lb on roast beef here. The people around the meat area were talking about becomming vegan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I pretty much buy what is on sale, too, and use that. I stock up on these sale things if they are not perishable and store up.

$10 a lb. for roast ? Wow. Prime rib maybe here, but so far not the chuck roast.

Guess I should buy some extra pork roasts on sale to freeze. Probably be glad to have the 50 lb. of dried beans I have later on. I should store some more nuts, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I paid over 15 for a small roast yesterday, its for christmas dinner or christmas eve dinner and roast beef samwiches.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just kind of go through :runcirclsmiley2::groooansmileyf::unsure: while :shopping: and............feeling the :smiley_shitfan: for me, and :faint3: when I put it away. Whats a full basket these days?????? with a few bits of meat in it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the cost for meat is going nuts. I'm trying to think of ways to cut back on it. I did start to cut chicken in to smaller pieces for things like chicken alfredo pasta, and when I made meatballs, I made them a bit smaller (dh noticed on that one). When I made boneless chicken breasts, I cut each breast in half width wise, they were thinner, but it was sufficient.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well I could manage a year ago but its all much more now. so its getting just bits of it now. and I do better with a bit more than that, lol, health wise. I do alot with tvp and beans too but had to take a break as the bulk of that was too much for the GI stuff so trying to take a break for a while. Tuna, sardines, smoked herring I eat and PB and nutella ( I treat that like a treat mostly but is sure good).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DEE, Please come back, wehere at Mrs. S. surely do miss you. My dh misses you too. I used to tell him your farming news. Pleassssssseeee..................

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I told DH that if it gets too bad, we'll be using meat as a condiment. :o

 

MtRider ---- Mr Carnivore didn't like that

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right now my general rule for meat is: ground round on sale (but it's been about $3.50 a pound on sale, so may cut back to ground chuck); boneless skinless chicken breast (can still find at $1.99 # but getting harder); bone-in chicken breast (.99 on sale); whole chicken still 69 cents a pound on sale. I had been buying already cut up stew meat because of convenience to use in soups and stews, but now I can't find it cheaper than $3.50 # on sale. I think I'll have to go back to buying round steak and cutting up my own. I've noticed pork seems to have good prices lately, but I don't eat much pork. I try to eat healthy because I'm diabetic, so I don't get the cheap cheap ground beef.

 

I've been lurking on a British money/frugal message board, and it's been an interesting read. They're already dealing with such issues over there, and have been for awhile. One thing I've seen mentioned a lot is extending the ground beef with lentils or other beans, bulger or other grains, depending on the dish. I think it will be a good idea to get a good collection of bean recipes collected....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Brits were dealing with this 42 years ago when I was a student over there one summer! :feedme: The last time I was there was 1988 (!) and they were the same . I should visit more often - I lose weight. :sigh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing I've seen mentioned a lot is extending the ground beef with lentils or other beans, bulger or other grains, depending on the dish.

 

I do this whenever I make any ground meat. Rice, bread crumbs, oatmeal, or lentils. One thing I have noticed is if you add it while you are cooking it, it picks up the flavor of the meat. It also soaks up any grease that might be lurking so there's less clean up. ;)

 

I also add a cup of rice to any soups we are making so it stretches it out a little more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only meat I routinely use is ground meat(buy it when $1.99/lb) and leg quarters (buy when they are less than $6.00/10#. I will buy a turkey for Christmas and maybe a shank ham when it is less than $1/lb. I add oatmeal when I make meatloaf and hamburgers. We add bread crumbs when making meatballs. I have cut down on how much I use in casseroles or stews. You can stretch a lot when there are several things in the same pot.

 

Of course, chili always has lots of pinto beans.

 

We have ground venison and venison sausage which I would dearly love to use since it was mostly free but hubby has started having trouble digesting it. Don't know if it is actual problems or just doesn't want to eat venison but have to take his word for it right now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The price of meat here has gone insane. Boneless chicken is now 9 euro per kilo.

A normal complete chicken, not too big, perhaps just over a kilo would set you back 8 or 9 euro as well.

 

Ground beef is 8 euro per kilo.

Seen turkeys but wayyyyyyyyyyy out of our league.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

  Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

Loading...