Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
CrabGrassAcres

Without warning, nuclear bomb attack

73 posts in this topic

I wish we could make everybody play nice and not do this. I wish a lot of things. Maybe it will never happen, but I'm not betting my life on it.

 

As for the wind. The weather people cannot even tell for sure where rain will fall and how much and they've been practicing doing that just about forever. How can they know where fallout will go? Too many variables to figure out. They are guessing it might go here or it might go there. They don't really know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the things ds#1 was taught in SF training was how to prepare a safe room. What this link did not mention was plants. Bring plants into your safe room. Especially if you have made it air tight. Plants will provide much need oxygen. Not only that but you can tell how clean your air is just by watching the plants.

 

Another thing if you have been exposed to radiation before entering your safe room strip out of your clothes and at least sponge off. It is best to have a changing room before entering the clean room. I know this was something that is done in hospitals in the rad rooms. There is an area for doctors and nurses to put on protective gowns and mask before entering the room of a patient that has had radiation treatments.

Edited by mommato3boys

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still just going to stay put with plans as scheduled. We're not in a direct line with any "major" cities or any other government facilities, and it will depend on what time of year it is, as to which way the wind will blow...for us. Again, guess we'll do the best we can and then "kiss it goodbye". Who would want to live in a "safe room" for years (if you could) unable to come out in such a contaminated world anyway? Transferring from earth to heaven isn't such a bad deal for us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Philbe.... If this information is correct, we're talking WEEKS in the safe room unless you are too close to blast zone.

 

.....and I would still like to get additional confirmation from various sources that aren't getting their information from Mr. Kearny. Just think that's wise.

 

Don't know about ongoing affects to weather, etc. :shrug:

 

HSshe.....ah, the fallout map IS 6 hours later. :thumbs: And I would definitely change the wind direction. It just doesn't blow from the east around here.

 

MtRider ---was a lot easier to assume we're all toast and going Home! :yar: But....God will have His way and if we might survive, I'd rather me and mine survive with the least amount out radiation intake as possible thru prepping.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Philbe, two or three weeks in a shelter fulltime and then one or two more just to sleep. After that you can go about your normal life.

 

Go back and read what I posted about the difference between bombs and energy facilities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mommato, I like the idea of having a plant or two down there. My basement is pretty big so I don't think I'd run out of air in two weeks :shrug:. According to my utility bills, nothing about my house is air tight. But plants sure wouldn't hurt. Plus they may help psychologically by seeing something alive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm late to this party, but this is an emergency that I've put some thought into over the years. We live about an hour and a half from our state capital and about 4 and a half hours from NYC.The first thing that I'd do is send hubby to get our oldest two daughters. They each live 5 minutes from us, but in opposite directions.The oldest has 5 children and is rather disorganized. She'd have to just throw the kids in the car and get to our house. The younger daughter always has a bag of "stuff" packed and would be able to leave her apartment almost immediately. I'd run next door to alert the family members there to the situation and instruct them to get into the basement with supplies to last for 3 weeks.

 

Our house is an old Victorian that stands about 40 feet tall with a full attic. We also have a full basement. It is one of those old dirty basements and not the "family room" type. While hubby was gone, youngest daughter and I would start hauling our camping equipment, futon mattress, bunk bed and sofa bed mattresses into the basement. We also have a full sized mattress that could be used. We already have plywood, nails, tape, plastic sheeting and tools to further secure and shield the basement. There are two, 40 gallon hot water tanks which can provide some water. I would also fill both bath tubs with water. The tubs are situated in the exact same place but on different floors. They could provide a good barrier to radiation. We'd sleep directly under them, as much as possible. There are also a couple of laundry sinks down there, so I'd fill those with water before turning off the water main. I'd also grab the rolling wood bins from the porch and drag them into the house. After the quarantine period, we might need the wood for heat and the bins hold enough wood to barely get us through two days each. This would keep us from having to go outside.

 

Youngest daughter would start hauling the 4 emergency bins down to the basement. They are filled with all kinds of stuff that might be useful, including meds,toiletries, extra toothbrushes KI, toilet paper, sanitation items,trash bags, flashlights, batteries, radio, matches, etc..I'd start moving the pantry into the basement. If there was time, I'd grab the hens out of the barn and put them in a cage inside the house. (I have a really large cage, and the house would be a safer place for them.) Inside or outside, I'd load them up with a lot of food to see them through and plenty of water. With so many people, I don't want to have animals in the basement with us. There will be enough unpleasant odors. The turtle would probably be alright in the main part of the house, too. He doesn't eat in the winter and I'd probably just give him a little extra water to keep it from evaporating. Daughter and I would put the quail into the barn and hope that they'd be okay. Worst case scenario, I have empty dog crates that the hens could go into so that they could be on the 1st floor, but they might not be safe from raccoons there and they shouldn't be kept in close proximity with the quail due to poultry diseases.

 

Hubby and everyone else should have arrived by this time, so I'd put them to work. The little ones would go in the basement with the older ones helping us to continue to move supplies into the basement. There are already bins of old toys and games down in the basement to occupy them. We can also fill laundry baskets with books to keep folks entertained. We'd move the rest of the stored water and food into the basement and shut off the furnace. We'd also move all of the dirty laundry and anything else into the bathrooms to provide additional mass to protect our basement sleeping area. Clean clothes and linens would be brought into the basement, as would all coats and winter gear. Keeping warm in the basement without a working furnace would be a challenge and we don't really have a workable heating solution for the basement that doesn't require ventilation.

 

We already have 5 gallon buckets in the basement and an old toilet seat. We could empty the waste into the basement drain pipe and pour disinfectant down it. There is a bookcase down in the basement that I'd planned to use to organize the food on, but I do like the idea of using books as a shield. Since that wasn't my initial thought, I don't want to claim it as a part of my plan!

 

We'd seal off the basement windows, but we'd be able to get air from the rest of the house. We'd start organizing the space. We'd put down a layer of cardboard or trash bags or whatever else under the mattresses to keep them off the ground and away from any dampness. There is a huge roll of carpet padding down there, so we'd find a use for that, too, maybe as a barrier to catch radioactive particles. We'd set up a food prep area by covering the workbench. There is already an old table down there that we could use. The aforementioned bookcase would become a pantry. If we remembered to bring the folding screens down, we could partition an area off for toileting and sponge-bathing. If not, we could string up a couple of tarps to create a space for that.

 

There would be 10 of us in an area that measures about 1000 square feet. We would either eat food that could be heated in a chafing dish or potpourri pot or just eat cold stuff. We have an old set of pots and pans in the basement that would be serviceable. We'd take the KI and hope for the best.That's about all that I can think of right now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Martian that sounds very well thought out! Good idea to add shielding to the floors above. One more thing you might want to think about is to get a couple of really heavy tables, put additional shielding materials on them and put the children's mattresses under them. They should sleep there and spend as much time as possible during the day there. Children are much more likely to be injured by radiation and need all the protection possible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Given my location, I'd be rubbing my eyes and then saying to St. Peter "Hi, reservation for $surname. Uhhh, I think I might be early." :scratchhead:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Probably" leaves room for you surviving the initial attack and dying from radiation poisoning because you did not make an effort to protect yourself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It seems like one bomb can't destroy an entire city.

 

No. See, you have a choice with one bomb. A low-level blast will maximize fallout and local destruction, but one hill or really sturdy building protects what's behind it to an extent, and if what's behind it is another hill or really sturdy building then what's behind those is going to get a fraction of the blast. Or you can have a high-level burst to maximize the spread but minimize any local impact. Picture people sitting in picnic chairs outside. In one scenario, it rains. Everyone gets a little wet. In the other, someone lobs a watermelon into the midst of the people. The people who get messed up in the second scenario are going to get a lot more messed up, but some of them will escape.

A bomb going off high enough would be mostly notable for the EMP wiping out electronics and communications.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today's bombs are smaller than the previous big ones that might wipe out an entire small or mid size city. Don't assume any bomb will hit the city center either. A bomb that can cause burns 5 miles out might kill you if you are at the city center and that is where it hits, but if it is off target by several miles you will only be affected by blast wind and fallout radiation or the burns may be 1st degree. Painful but not deadly. (Think sunburn.) NEVER assume that you will die in the initial bomb burst. If you have made adequate preparations, including reading, studying and thinking thru the situation ahead of time and you die in the initial blast, what have you lost? If you assumed that you would die so made no preparation or inadequate preparation and are caught in fallout without protection, you will die, only it will be after great suffering. Not that many will die in the initial blast but MANY will die of radiation poisoning that they could have prevented by making adequate preparations.

Edited by CrabGrassAcres

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We need a way of washing ourselves to get the contamination off and forget putting your clothes back on.

How about keeping some burn oitment in large amounts around.

Potassium iodine and lots of water to drink.

 

My Mother was exposed to radioactive isotopes released by Hanford back in the early 50's. I doubt she new better than to try and decontaminate herself. She did get Potassium iodine and they did a study on her for years, which we didn't know till she died. She died from 3 different types on cancers, but she had at least lived a normal life for 50 years after exposure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was just reading info that I printed and didn't notice any mention of vitamin D. Since we won't be getting any sunlight we will need to take D as our bodies don't make it or hold on to it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm gone! I live 2 mi from the Captial and 6 miles from TMI - if I lived where I wanted to, that would be different, but I don't have my house with a basement yet and every room in the house has windows in it! We unfortunately wouldn't have time to even put plastic up on a window. . . :( My youngest son would survive, he is 3 hours away at school. My older boy is home with me. . .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

chefddr, in your case, one must duck and cover , and keep their eyes covered so the flash of the burst does not burn the eyes and blind you, get to the other side of most solid structure or in a ditch that is several feet deep on the side of the road or something and huddle and hide your eyes, or behind a solid building, cement wall is better than nothing. The burst if it doesnt just disentegrate things , will cause the shockwave....... ok I know we have good threads on exactly what happens, you basically have moments to react.

 

Just do that , teach your son to do same , If you hear explosions or feel impacts , do that to begin with as close as you are to a major target...... Wait 15 mins. Then take your shirt or something and cover nose and mouth to help not breath in all that radiated dust and toxic crap in the air after things quit falling around the area you are in. . Avoid buildings after that because they will be structurally weakened and further bombings and disturbance and winds may make pieces fall off or knock it down., and get far away as soon as you can. You may have to walk out. Then worry about fallout avoidance. When you get home, take a shower after removing clothing and shoes. Shoes can be wiped off usually if leather, athletic shoes washed , , the soles rinsed off. Bag up and Throw out all contaminated clothing you were wearing.

 

Wear clothing from your clothing that is clean from your home after that. Treat skin that is burned and lacerated and first aid for injuries. Bring in pets and wash them down . Most people can take the potassium iodide tablets and there are dosages for humans and pets and livestock ,( small )by weight may save milk goats possibly. It doesnt hurt and I would rather do that and maybe avoid thyroid cancers and death with everything I have to help me than poo poo something meant for that very thing. It is actually reccommended to take it for 3 wks to a month, rather than two weeks. It simply stops the radiation uptake by the thyroid.

 

One of the problems with living inside a 12- 25 mile perimeter to a metro area that obviously is struck by nukes , is that it is truly is uninhabitable and you would lose your home there. They would simply make you evac permanently. They had to do that . Usually cannot resume living in such a place for 25 yrs, if that, to be safe again.

 

It might be a consideration for ya , where to look for a home now. I honestly think our nation is very vulnerable on the coasts to this very thing.

 

This is a good thread because it makes one think of how to manage to survive in case of an attack. It makes us each consider what we have at home to be innovative with ........or maybe in your case, how to get home, say you were shopping in the city at the mall , and this goes on as you are driving home or walking down to get your car from where it is parked. How one stays safe in the blast zone I think either Les Stroud or Bear Gryllis did an episode on that very thing btw. Look them up on Discovery.com and maybe you can watch that very episode. They did a good , thoughtful job on it.

 

 

Hopefully nobody here gets vaporized, that would just suck. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dianne, it still doesn't hurt anything to read the info provided. Plastic won't help anyhow, waste of time to put it up. Windows or no windows makes no difference, walls aren't enough to protect you. If you survive the initial blast, you CAN survive the fallout IF you have read up and know what to do. Do download the book and read it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

  Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0