Mt_Rider

EE Blog - 5 Health Problems from HEAT

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This has good information and it's timely to review as we move into summer's heat.  :knary: 

With MS...we have what is called "Heat Stroke" but has slightly different cause.  And I've ALREADY had the beginnings of my first episode of this right there in the doctor's office last week.  Sheeesh.  In my case, I do not always know it's coming on....can't feel that I'm getting THAT hot.....till I'm well into it. 

 

 

 

Heat Related Stress: Treatment and Prevention

The dangerous effects of unusually high temperatures on the human body fall into three basic types: Heat Cramps, Heat Exhaustion, and Heat Stroke. The heat may come from the sun or in industrial settings such as open-hearth furnaces in steel mills, multiple ovens in bakeries, boiler rooms, mines, and some factories, or it may result from house fires or wildfires which affect firefighters and residents alike. Construction and road crews, farmers, ranchers, and other outdoor workers are at risk from the sun’s heat, as well as runners, bikers, hikers, and other outdoor sports enthusiasts.

Stay hydrated and keep cool during heat waves.

Heat Cramps are muscle spasms caused by the loss of salt and potassium through heavy perspiration. Often the lost water will have been replaced, but the necessary minerals—potassium and sodium—have not. These cramps may affect the legs, arms, or stomach. They may occur while the person is still engaged in the strenuous activity that produces the sweating—such as athletes who collapse with cramps on the football field or basketball floor—or they may suddenly occur later during the night or when he or she is relaxing at home. Although these cramps can be quite painful and temporarily debilitating, they do not usually result in permanent damage. Treat with a gentle massage of the affected muscle, manipulating the limb (bending or rotating it), and trying to stand on cramping legs. To prevent cramps, drink electrolyte solutions (sports drinks) during the day—along with plain water—and eat more potassium-rich foods such as bananas, orange juice, avocado, nuts and seeds, dried apricots, prunes, dates and raisins, baked potatoes, and dark chocolate.

Heat Exhaustion is more serious than cramping—the body’s internal cooling system becomes overworked, but hasn’t completely shut down. Heat exhaustion occurs when you don’t drink enough fluids to replace that which is lost. This is especially easy to do in hot, dry conditions. Dry heat can cause the sweat to evaporate from your skin’s surface quickly, so you may not be aware of how much you’re perspiring. The surface blood vessels and capillaries, which normally enlarge to cool the blood, collapse from loss of fluids and necessary minerals. Symptoms of heat exhaustion include:

-          Headache

-          increased perspiration

-          intense thirst

-          dizziness, fatigue

-          loss of coordination

-          nausea

-          impaired judgment

-          loss of appetite

-          hyperventilation

-          tingling in the hands and feet

-          anxiety

-          weak and rapid pulse (120-200 beats per minute)

-          cool, moist skin, and

-          below-normal blood pressure

Treatment of heat exhaustion includes moving the affected person to a cooler place—shade or an air-conditioned building—and having them lie down with the feet slightly elevated. Loosen the clothing, apply cool, wet cloths, and fan them. Have them drink sports drinks or water. Do all you can to cool them down and have them checked by medical personnel. They should avoid strenuous activity for at least a day and consume plenty of liquids.

Heat Stroke is a life-threatening condition with a high death-rate. It occurs when the body has completely depleted its supply of water and salt, causing the core temperature to rise to deadly levels. The victim may progress to this dangerous condition through the stages of heat cramps and heat exhaustion, but not always. Sometimes the onset appears suddenly, especially if the heat is extreme. Often heat stroke is mistaken for heart attack, especially in the workplace. It’s important to know the symptoms of heat stroke and check for them anytime a person collapses in a hot environment. Those symptoms include:

-          a high body temperature (103° F or higher);

-          the absence of perspiration;

-          hot, red, and dry skin

-          a rapid pulse

-          difficulty breathing

-          constricted pupils

as well as the signs of extreme heat exhaustion:

-          dizziness

-          nausea

-          confusion

-          slurred speech

-          bizarre behavior

-          collapse

-          loss of consciousness

-          hallucinations

-          high blood pressure

-          ultimately a spike in temperature to 108° F, seizure or convulsions, and death

Seconds count in saving the person’s life. Call 911, pour water on the victim, loosen or saturate his clothing, fan him, get him to a cooler place, and apply cold packs.

Preventing heat stroke is a matter of several factors. If you know you are going to be working or playing in extremely hot temperatures, condition yourself ahead of time by starting slowly and building up to more strenuous levels of activity. Allow a few days for your body to adjust. (If you’re starting a new job in outdoor summer conditions, hopefully your boss will understand this principle!) Drink a little more than you think you need; do not wait until you feel thirsty. Use water and electrolyte preparations, consuming about one cup of liquid every 15-20 minutes in very hot conditions.

Avoid alcohol or caffeinated beverages such as coffee, tea, or soda pop—they do not hydrate your body well. In fact, caffeine increases your heart rate and cardiac output, sending more blood to the kidneys and increasing urination, which contributes to dehydration. Therefore, do not depend on the water in caffeinated beverages to be sufficient to hydrate your body. If you use them, drink additional water to replace what they cause you to lose. It’s probably better to use soda pop as an occasional treat rather than a daily staple. Alcohol is a diuretic as well and the symptoms of a hangover are those of dehydration. (Note: Do not consume excessive amounts of water –or any liquid—all at once in an effort to re-hydrate your body. Drink slowly.)

If you begin to feel faint or develop a headache, take a break and cool off before getting back to your activity. Wear light-weight, light-colored clothing, take advantage of fans and air-conditioners, and get plenty of sleep at night. Try to perform your most strenuous and difficult tasks during the coolest part of the day

People who are the most vulnerable to heat-stress conditions include those who fall in the following categories, though no one is immune:

-          over 65 and overweight

-          high blood pressure or heart disease

-          taking diuretics or medications that may be affected by extreme heat

Pregnant women, especially during the first trimester, should not have a core temperature higher than 102.2° F for extended periods, as that can cause a risk of abnormal fetal development. A perpetual core temperature above 100.4° F in both males and females is associated with temporary infertility.

 

In addition to the main three heat-induced conditions mentioned above, there are additional conditions you should be aware of.

Heat Syncope is fainting or extreme lightheadedness that usually occurs with prolonged standing or suddenly rising from a sitting or lying position in hot conditions. Blood pools in the extremities rather than returning to the heart to be pumped to the brain. Contributing factors include dehydration and lack of acclimation to the conditions. Treatment is to sit or lie down, then slowly drink water, clear juice, or a sports beverage. After recovery, moving around will help to prevent a recurrence.

Heat Rash, also known as prickly heat, is a skin irritation characterized by clusters of red pimples or small blisters occurring on the neck, upper chest, in the groin area, under the breasts, and in elbow or knee creases. Gently cleanse the affected area, pat dry, and allow to “air out.” Use dusting powder to increase comfort. If possible, try to work in a cooler, drier area.

Knowing a few basics about the prevention and treatment of heat-stress conditions and following them can prevent much misery and even save lives. Stay cool!

 

MtRider  B)  .....stay safe all.

 

 

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Quoting:

 

People who are the most vulnerable to heat-stress conditions include those who fall in the following categories, though no one is immune:

-          over 65 and overweight
-          high blood pressure or heart disease
-          taking diuretics or medications that may be affected by extreme heat  

:hi: 

 

 

Except the over 65 part. I've still got 3 weeks to go.  :pout:

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Hubby's already come home with heat exhaustion once this summer.

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Heat is especially nasty to folks with limited sodium diets.  Nu-Salt is one brand of commercial Potassium Chloride salt substitute (100%).  What got me is that a tablespoon is 90% of the RDA.  Another old trick is to put a 'pinch' of baking soda in two liters of tea, to clarify, and baking soda is an 'electrolyte'.

 

Sipping on some 'sweet water', our stevia tea.

.

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Good point, Sarah.  We have a "hyperthermic event"  [too much heat] drink.  Lime or lemon juice and a pinch of Himmalayan [that is SO not spelled right...the mountains near Nepal]   pink salt.  Something else but I forget.  Lots of ICE in the drink too.  Our property manager had brought some for her dh while they worked on our house last summer.  I did an episode on step #5....didn't make it up into house where we have swamp cooler.  Once J realized what I had going, she rushed to their truck and had me slug some of that down.  B hollered down to barnyard at DH and he got me up to cool room.  They'd found out when B went into a bad episode...woke up in hospital.  Which was why J was not hesitating at all with me like limp noodle and 1/4th brain.  Serious stuff.

 

MtRider .....woke to 20 degrees this morning but had meltdown at doc office last week.  Cool outside but buildings can be too hot for me.  :knary:

Edited by Mt_Rider

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The CG...does your dh work outside in heat?  It's so hard to avoid in places like TX. 

 

MtRider......hydration helps.... :bev: 

 

 

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I'm definitely not on salt restriction.  From reading, it may be recommended that I be consuming 6g or more of salt per day, due to some medical stuff.

 

I put salt and NuSalt in my water, along with packets of True Orange or True Lime to help with the flavor.  I change between Real Salt (from Utah), Himalayan salt, Celtic sea salt, and black lava salt for the different mineral profiles.

 

I can drink all the water I want during the summer and still feel on the verge of passing out unless I add in my salts and such.

 

MtRider, hubby is a driver but helps clean the open-air shop when he doesn't have anything to deliver.  He was cleaning when it happened.

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With MS, I've been told by two different docs to increase salt moderately in the summer.  Since childhood, I've always tended to get dizzy in the heat.....which makes sense as a precursor to MS related hypERthermia.  I crave Lays potato chips ...only in summer.  Usually I crave sweets.  :busted:

 

We use sea salt for regular cooking.  Sometimes we get packages of Hawaiian sea salt [has to be special from our kids, right?].  Once DD2 sent a variety pack of salts.  Black lava was one....it was labeled HOT ...as in spicey?  I didn't open it.  Was a reddish colored one too.  And usual white.  Didn't really understand what made the differences.

 

MtRider  :bev:

Edited by Mt_Rider
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Sometimes I crave Lays potato chips too. Has to be Lays regular chips. Strange. My downfall isn't sweets, salt or chocolate...although I do like them. My usual crave is tangy. Like a mustard/ketchup mix. I'm supposed to be on salt restriction due to high blood pressure. I use Salt Sense at home except I do use canning salt in my home canned food.

 

The heat makes me nauseous and very dizzy. Also my hands swell. I've never been able to tolerate heat very well.

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18 hours ago, Mt_Rider said:

With MS, I've been told by two different docs to increase salt moderately in the summer.  Since childhood, I've always tended to get dizzy in the heat.....which makes sense as a precursor to MS related hypERthermia.  I crave Lays potato chips ...only in summer.  Usually I crave sweets.  :busted:

 

We use sea salt for regular cooking.  Sometimes we get packages of Hawaiian sea salt [has to be special from our kids, right?].  Once DD2 sent a variety pack of salts.  Black lava was one....it was labeled HOT ...as in spicey?  I didn't open it.  Was a reddish colored one too.  And usual white.  Didn't really understand what made the differences.

 

MtRider  :bev:

 

Black lava salt tends to have coconut charcoal in it.  They may have added something to it to make it spicy.  The reddish one may have been Alaea salt from Hawaii.  From what I understand, it has a slightly smoky flavor to it.  Nom Nom Paleo has a recipe for Kalua Pig (in the Instant Pot or slow cooker) using it that I totally want to try out sometime.

 

The colors are caused by different minerals carried in the salt.  If you want to dig deeper, here's the mineral profile for Himalayan salt and here's the one for Real Salt - Real Salt has over twice the calcium but a third of the potassium.

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http://pacificahawaii.com/

 

Ingredients in HOT Black Lava Sea Salt:  Solar evaporated sea salt, activated charcoal, organic cayenne pepper, chili flakes  :knary:

 

Yes, I recognize the name of the reddish...Alaea.  It's used up by now.  Was good. 

 

Oh my!  That kalua pork made my mouth water.  I'm going to save her slow cooker recipe, for sure.  Pork is a low price meat and cooking it different ways is great.  SIL's gramma told me to add a touch of Liquid Smoke if I'm not cooking it in the imu [pit in ground].

 

MtRider  :feedme:

Edited by Mt_Rider
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2 hours ago, Mt_Rider said:

Kinda off topic but....that link for Hawaiian sea salts with different flavors/minerals also has some recipes:

 

http://pacificahawaii.com/recipes-traditional.php

 

MtRider  ...sea salt carmels might beat Lays potato chips. :yum3:

 

Especially once they're dipped in chocolate and sprinkled with a bit more salt...

 

 

...what?!?

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3 hours ago, Mt_Rider said:

http://pacificahawaii.com/

 

Ingredients in HOT Black Lava Sea Salt:  Solar evaporated sea salt, activated charcoal, organic cayenne pepper, chili flakes  :knary:

 

Yes, I recognize the name of the reddish...Alaea.  It's used up by now.  Was good. 

 

Oh my!  That kalua pork made my mouth water.  I'm going to save her slow cooker recipe, for sure.  Pork is a low price meat and cooking it different ways is great.  SIL's gramma told me to add a touch of Liquid Smoke if I'm not cooking it in the imu [pit in ground].

 

MtRider  :feedme:

 

...I just remembered that I have a thing of alder-smoked salt.  I, uh, might need to use that on it.

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Related.  Looking for the original recipe for Gator Aide.  I know it is in Majere's study somewhere, but not finding it.  Anybody got it?

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This isn't GatorAide stuff.  But it's a rehydration fluid to take sips....

 

Quote

One-half teaspoon salt

 


One-half teaspoon baking soda

Three Tablespoons sugar

One liter/quart water

 

Take tiny sips as frequently as possible.

 

 

The Usual Note:  MrsS is not a doctor's site.  Do not take any suggestions here as a replacement for a doctor's advice.  As always, do your own research.

 

MtRider :knary:  :bev: 

Edited by Mt_Rider

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Thank you to both of you.  I especially enjoyed the comments in the instructable.  I am going to put this search on hold, so it will show up when not looking. :happy0203:  His used lemon juice. 

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Being in the heat 3/4ths of the year, we are hyper alert to health problems from the heat.

 

We always carry a small day pack with packets of salt and sugar.  Water in quantity and a basic first aid kit, including a towel that can be moistened to cool. 

 

DH has dipped the towel in the ice chest water and frozen me with shock, to bring me out of an episode. We try to hydrate prior to our outings, and continue to hydrate during them. 

 

Interesting info about the salts.  :thumbs:

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Ice Melt Water.......  :wacko:  ....that would be EFFECTIVE......... if you don't have a heart attack!  Aiiieeee!  :runcirclsmiley2:

 

I reuse the capsules that the "flu remedy" [homeopathic....Occi -something] comes in.  Made from tough plastic.  It will hold grains of Himalayan salt.  I tape it so it won't lose the cap in my pocket.  Have one in my barn clothes and my 'in town' clothes.  I think I'll make one with sugar too, Annarchy.  :thumbs:  

 

When I do go into town, I have an insulated small container [5"x3" - originally to carry insulin maybe?] that I keep AT THE READY in the freezer.  Contains one small ice pack with a gel pack on either side of it.  I use the gel packs on my body to cool and the ice pack keeps the gel packs cold ....and gets them cold again if I'm using them.  Gel packs don't stay cold long on their own but conform to body better than a hunk of ice.

 

My freezers upstairs and downstairs always have ice packs and gel packs....tho my frantic property manager couldn't find either in the downstairs freezer when I had that episode with her.  DH got them when they called him up from barnyard tho.  Makes me think I might want to make them more obvious to find....if I'm down and have to send someone for them. 

 

I also carry the First Aid icy packs....dry until you break the capsule inside and mix the ingredients around.  Then it's quite cold .....but for a limited time.  I save those for when I don't have anything else available. 

 

Remember also that if you have a breeze....or a fan....evaporation will cool nicely.  This works best if your air is not already saturated with humidity.  But I've always told others around me that they can "throw me in the horse trough"  if I'm in that much danger.  That was literal when we were at the horse program...but now refers to the shower or pond/creek.  I define to them "that much danger"......means I'm not able to respond verbally in a normal way to them.  If you can't understand me....I'M IN IMMEDIATE DANGER OF DEATH!  :faint3:  Sounds like Annarchy knows exactly what I'm talking about.  Not an overstatement. 

 

:frozen: Of course I've started this thread and we've been having SNOWSTORMS ever since..... :rolleyes:   Another few inches late yesterday again.  Most melted quickly in this morning's sunshine.  But...clouded up a few minutes ago and there is still snow on the trees.  Normal for us EXCEPT the part where it's not warming up in the daytime.    :frozen:

 

Note:  I have had several of my worst hypERthermic episodes in WINTER!  True!  MS makes me more sensitive to any heat but other folks might also.  Just to keep in the back of your mind. Snow works well for cooling if needed.

 

  PS:  Do not cause frostbite from applying any ice packs /gel packs/snow.  Move them around to prevent that.  :frozen:

 

MtRider  :bev:  :knary:

Edited by Mt_Rider

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22 minutes ago, Mt_Rider said:

Ice Melt Water.......  :wacko:  ....that would be EFFECTIVE......... if you don't have a heart attack!  Aiiieeee!  :runcirclsmiley2:

 

:coffeescreen:

 

 

22 minutes ago, Mt_Rider said:

 

  PS:  Do not cause frostbite from applying any ice packs /gel packs/snow.  Move them around to prevent that.  :frozen:

 

MtRider  :bev:  :knary:

 

Wrapping the packs in a small hand towel / cloth, helps keeping frostbite at bay.

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3 hours ago, Mt_Rider said:

[5"x3" - originally to carry insulin maybe?]

 

 

May be, but discontinued policy.  When shipping insulin, must now be a minimum 36 cu inch space.  The cold packs were liquidizing the boxs, and then freezing the insulin vials.  You have a 'collectable' there.

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There is another alternate you might want to look out for, instead of the cold / gel packs, which have to be frozen beforehand.  The Army uses cold bags where you put in water, and it freezes.  Cloth bag.  Reusable.  You sometimes see them at surplus sites.  Five or six uses, drying out each time.  They used to be part of our medic kits.  There are also 'pull tab' packs, like a desiccator brick, but not reusable..

 

I just got busted by my Lee.  Sipping a bit of pickle juice.  She told me that there is a lot of potassium in that.  Hmm...  Never thought of that, just like the taste occasionally.

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