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Canning hotdogs?


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#1 Genoa

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 06:57 PM

I seem to remember reading somewhere about canning weiners and, at the time, I wondered, "Why would anyone want to do that?"

Recently, however, I made some bean/lentil soup that was okay, but needed to be kicked up a notch, so I added some cut up spicy hot franks. It then occurred to me that it would be nice to have something like this around to add occasionally to bean and/or lentil soup for variety.

I'm thinking that there might be an issue with the density of the frankfurters (although I would cut them up) or possibly the casings, but I figured it wouldn't hurt to ask.

#2 Keiko

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 07:34 PM

My first thought would be to check the ingredient list on the franks - dairy and cornstarch are BIG no-no's for canning.

If the franks have acceptable ingredients, then I would look up the processing time for your longest cooking ingredient (usually some sort of meat).

If they do have dairy or cornstarch, you could just can up the bean/lentil soup and then add the franks when you heat it up to serve.

BTW, your soup sounds yummy!

#3 Genoa

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Posted 15 February 2007 - 01:17 AM

Thanks Keiko. I was just thinking of a way to have the frankfurters available without electricity for refrigerator and freezer. I was thinking of canning the frankfurters by themselves, without the soup, so that I could make the soup however I wanted and then just add the frankfurters as desired. They could be added to chili, as well.

The soup was pretty good. I actually used a recipe (usually just throw in whatever sounds good when making soup) because I wanted to practice making something from my pantry only---all dried foods and spices. As I said, the soup was a bit bland for my taste, but I think that's because the recipe called for adding rice, as well as black beans and lentils, to the soup. Without the rice, I think it would have been more flavorful. Next time I'm going to make it without the rice to see how it tastes; but I'd sure like the option of being able to spice it up with the hot frankfurters once in a while. If I do want the rice, I think I will serve the soup over the rice, rather than cooking them together.

By the way, I also made this soup as an experiment using my retained heat cooker. It worked great! I presoaked the beans and lentils for four hours; then I heated the initial ingredients (water, spices, dried minced onion, black beans, and lentils) to a boil and then let sit for 2 hours. After 2 hours the temperature was still close to 180 degrees. I heated it to a boil again, added the rice, and let sit for another 2-3 hours. Everything cooked thoroughly, as well as stayed well within safe temperature ranges with only two boilings in a 4-5 hour period of time.

#4 Keiko

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Posted 15 February 2007 - 12:05 PM

In that case, sausage should be packed and processed like ground meat (hot pack: pre-cook until medium done, pour off all fat, pack into jars leaving 1-inch headspace, cover with boiling water or broth leaving 1-inch headspace, process at 10 pounds for 90 minutes/quarts or 75 minutes/pints).

There is also a note that spices change flavor in storage (according to Stocking Up). If your ingredient list checks out on your sausage, I would suggest trying a sample pint before processing a whole bunch...just to make sure you're happy with the flavor before you invest a whole bunch of time and money.

#5 HSmom

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Posted 15 February 2007 - 01:35 PM

Quote:
By the way, I also made this soup as an experiment using my retained heat cooker.


Is a retained heat cooker something you make or buy? If it's something you buy, do you have a link to share?

TIA!


Trying not to keep all my eggs in one basket....

#6 Genoa

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Posted 15 February 2007 - 04:16 PM

HS Mom, here's a link to what I bought---

http://shopping.msn.com/prices/shp/?itemId=79436242

I would like to make another, following the various directions that can be found if you search for "haybox." It's a bit spendy, but I can see using it a lot---emergency or non-emergency---whereas a homemade haybox system I probably wouldn't use as often, due to the bulk and the problem of finding room to put it somewhere. I am going to continue to use it so that I can continue to check temperatures for safety at reasonable intervals (i.e., every 2-3 hours). I won't want to be opening up the cooker any more than I have to if the power is out, as each time I open it I will lose heat.

Keiko, Good point about the seasonings. I wasn't asking about sausage, but rather frankfurters (big weiners) that I was wondering if I could slice and can (covered in boiling water).

#7 SueC

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Posted 15 February 2007 - 08:41 PM

I have seen a similar idea to a haybox used very effectively. Simply bring pot to boil take off the heat and put it to bed! Basically you wrap the pot in a couple of blankets/doonas/duvets/quilts. (does that cover everything?)and leave alone for the afternoon.

Having said that I saw it demonstrated in NZ and I have never tried it myself. I also have had a roast in the oven for 45 minutes when the power went out. Thinking dinner was no hope, when the power came on again I pulled it out to check - it was perfectly cooked and just needed a little browning. So the retained heat in the oven can be useful.

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#8 Keiko

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 06:32 PM

Quote:
I wasn't asking about sausage, but rather frankfurters (big weiners) that I was wondering if I could slice and can (covered in boiling water).


It should work the same

#9 Keiko

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 06:36 PM

Quote:
I wasn't asking about sausage, but rather frankfurters (big weiners) that I was wondering if I could slice and can (covered in boiling water).


They are both processed the same

#10 YYY

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Posted 18 February 2007 - 02:03 AM

Hi Everybody,

We L-O-V-E Johnsonville Hot Links. The information above makes it look as though canning some of these MIGHT be possible. Before I start canning, please read what the label says and let me know what you think.

Johnsonville Hot Links smoked sausage made with real Jalapeno & Red Peppers

INGREDIENTS: Pork, water and LESS THAN 2% of the following: salt, corn syrup, spice, hydrolyzed skim milk PROTEIN, sodium and potassium lactate, paprika, flavoring, sodium phosphate, jalapeno pepper, sodium diacetate, sodium erythorbate, sodium nitrite, collagen casing

Fully Cooked Keep Refrigerated


So what do y’all think? I'm questioning: Less than 2% (1) hydrolyzed skim milk PROTEIN and (2) potassium LACTATE (is lactate some kind of milk or milk product?)

Can I can these using Keiko's method ????

Thanks,

YYY
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#11 Keiko

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Posted 18 February 2007 - 07:37 PM

Maybe there is a canning "expert" around to help out with this one...

anyone?

My thinking is that there is dairy...so no But maybe you could try dehydrating it?

#12 Mother

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Posted 07 July 2008 - 11:15 AM

Bumping this up because of a super buy on hot dogs this week. Has anyone figured out how to do this and what about dehydrating them? yuk But the grand kids and DH loves them.

bighug

#13 Stephanie

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Posted 07 July 2008 - 12:24 PM

Your post made me curious....so here's what I found.

http://t2chk.org/sylviasblog/?p=268

http://www.christianhomekeeper.com/Special.html

#14 ATHagan

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Posted 07 July 2008 - 12:29 PM

I have canned hotdogs. I cut them into half-inch lengths and canned as per the usual meat pressures and times. The finished product was a bit soft, but perfectly fine for the beany-weenies I wanted them for. The kids didn't complain.

The small amounts of dairy products and/or starch in the dogs won't be a problem as they do not cause the water in the jar to thicken which would interfere with proper heat flow within.

.....Alan.



#15 Mother

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 08:59 AM

Stephanie and Alan, thanks for the advice.

Alan, the ones that Stephanie gave me calls for cutting them up in a sauce. Did you use water or broth or any other liquid with yours? I had hoped to can them whole to use on buns if needed but would consider cutting them too. It's amazing how little info there was on canning them on the net.

bighug

#16 ATHagan

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 10:45 AM

I did mine in just water. I'd be concerned about using any sort of thickened sauce as it could interefere with the necessary heat flow within the jar.

I haven't tried this yet myself but you might could use kosher dogs that don't have so much filler in them to can whole. Regular dogs I think would split bad in the canning process.

.....Alan.

#17 etp777

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 11:34 AM

Alan, was about to give same suggestion on checking the Kosher dogs. Cost a bit more up front, but less likely to have issue with fillers, etc. Plus, for my taste at least, they taste better.
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#18 Mother

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Posted 10 July 2008 - 07:21 PM

Thanks, as soon as it gets a bit cooler I'll give it a try. smile

bighug

#19 Buttercup

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 07:05 PM

Backwoods Home



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#20 Violet

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Posted 12 July 2008 - 05:25 AM

Those are not USDA tested sites or recipes. So, if you want safe information don't follow those other sites. Those folks have no training in food safety that write those things . I would not suggest using hot dogs with fillers. Only fresh meats should be canned.
There are no USDA guides for hot dogs. Ground meat like sausage, yes, but not hot dogs.


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