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#1 OINK

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Posted 24 April 2009 - 07:49 AM

I'm sorry to say that I don't have a good book on identifying plants. This one is growing in huge clumps in my front yard!
Anyone know what this is?



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#2 Lady Yarrow

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Posted 24 April 2009 - 08:17 AM

It looks like ground ivy
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#3 Homemaker

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Posted 24 April 2009 - 08:23 AM

I don't know what it's called, but I have it too.

My "lawn" is really a mowed meadow, so I don't freak about weeds there. It does attract a lot of insects that will also pollinate my garden. I'm sure it attracts a lot of the good bugs that eat the bad ones.





#4 Cat

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Posted 24 April 2009 - 09:05 AM

Looks like you've got "Henbit".

It's related to mint, so that's why the leaves look like mint. It's also confused with "purple deadnettle", also a close relative.

http://www.ppws.vt.e...ed_id/lamam.htm

http://www.colostate...Weed/henbit.htm



These places say it's edible...
http://turtlerockfar...-little-henbit/

http://groups.google...ture/web/henbit
"Decoctions and teas of henbit (Lamium amplexicaule) are used to relieve rheumatism, as a laxitive, a stimulant and also to induce sweating."

http://davesgarden.c...es/pf/go/53157/ (halfway down)...
~The Encyclopedia of Edible Plants of North America says this....
"The leaves of L. album, L. amplexicaule, L. maculatum, and L. purpureum are eaten raw or cooked in Europe and Asia. They are not aromatic, but have a pleasant taste and make good salad greens."~

Of course, BE VERY CAREFUL about trying *too much* of anything until you know more about if your body tolerates it!

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#5 Fullpantry

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Posted 24 April 2009 - 10:39 AM

I have this stuff everywhere! Nice to know you can eat it!! Let me make sure I'm right - you can eat both henbit AND deadnettle??? So whichever one it is, I won't be poisoning myself? I'm really interested in using wild edibles in our diets, but I'm such a nervous nellie - even when I know its perfectly safe like dandilions!!!

#6 sassenach

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Posted 24 April 2009 - 11:10 AM

Yes, glad its edible. It grows all over the place around here. Nice to know.

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#7 OINK

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Posted 24 April 2009 - 11:30 AM

Homemaker, our place is on what was once a peach orchard, so I don't worry about weeds growing in the yard. It drives my one neighbor crazy because I don't spray anything on the weeds in it and they go to seed and then invade his pristine lawn ( that they don't ever use ) LMAO

Cat, Thank You! for the info. Nice to know we can eat it.

While I was taking the pics, there were all kinds of bees on it. Especially honey bees! They love my basil I grow in the corners of my garden beds like mad. Somebody is getting basil honey from their bees LOL

I use all the dandelion, wild clover and chicory for my rabbit. He absolutely goes crazy when he knows it's time to start getting it as his greens every morning.

Thanks again for the answers!
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#8 CrabGrassAcres

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Posted 24 April 2009 - 11:48 AM

Chickens love hen bit, try giving a little to bunny.
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#9 Homemaker

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Posted 24 April 2009 - 12:14 PM

Oink,
Glad to hear that you're doing your part to spread edibles around the neighborhood!! laugh.gif

We should all be more generous.





#10 Mother

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Posted 24 April 2009 - 03:38 PM

I would have said ground ivy as well until I realized that the flowers are not growing in the leaf axils but at the top.

It looks like henbit but as with ALL foods in the wild that you want to eat.....be absolutely SURE of your ID before you try it. Try it with caution even then as you won't know how you will react to it even if you never react with anything else.

Also make sure it is not sprayed with chemicals and that it's not growing where exhaust fumes can contaminate it. (like along the road or beside the driveway where a car idles)

By the way, ground Ivy can be used as a tea. It has a very strong odor compared to henbit. It's good to find out what is edible in your neighborhood/fields/roadsides now before you might need it in a survival situation. It's also good to get used to eating them before hand, saves money on groceries and is healthy for you unless you mis-ID it. Be safe and let us know how you liked it. biggrin.gif


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#11 OINK

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Posted 24 April 2009 - 06:19 PM

Thank you for that warning Mother wink.gif LOL
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#12 Ambergris

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Posted 24 April 2009 - 06:42 PM

It looks very much like Florida Betony. Pull up a few to see if the roots look like white rattlesnake rattles, if the bulbous parts crush easily, and if the crushed roots smell like fresh French radishes.

Edited by Ambergris, 24 April 2009 - 06:43 PM.



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