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Goat Depression ??


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#1 Rezgirl

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 11:02 AM

So we bought a goat, a doe about a year old, 2 days ago.

We hoped she'd help out with weed control issues.

She was in a small herd of 4 or 5 goats and she was the bully, which is the reason the previous owner was willing to sell her. She was picking on another goat that is pregnant.

When we got her home, we put her on a chain and I was attempting to fasten the chain to a fence post, when she bolted, pulling the chain through my hand and ripping skin off my fingers. angry.gif

She leaped across the cattle guard and was outta here, full speed ahead. DFoster Son and DH caught up to her 1/2 mile away, and brought her back.

Since then we have her hobbled. She seems lethargic and is not eating much.

Do we just wait this out, or is there anything we can do to help with adjustment?

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#2 Stephanie

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 11:15 AM

(((Rez)))

Goats are great BUT they can be a pain, as you now know.

The first thing is they are herd animals. She is not going to be content by herself. You may be able to find another doe or get a Wether (billy that's been fixed) as a companion.

The other first thing is shelter, not sure what you've got fixed for her, but she nneds a shed, a stable or something. This does not have to be fancy, but it is necessary.

WATER! They need cool water, I'm sure this is going to be a challenge in your climate.

STRESS! They will shut down with stress, they actually sell products (made with molasses for one thing) to give them when they are moved from one home to another, having a baby, etc.. We use one called Drench.

http://www.hoeggergo...o...t=85&page=2

#3 Stephanie

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 11:17 AM

In addition, what are you feeding her? Are you expecting her to just eat brush? Are you providing her hay? I'm not sure what kind of vegetation you have in your area.

Also, what kind of goat is she? Are you planning on milking her? Pictures? smile.gif

#4 Rezgirl

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 02:41 PM



We named her Gallina, pronounced Guy-eena, since we bought her in Gallina, NM

She may have some Nubian? I was told she was mixed. Heinz 57 variety goat?? wink.gif

We have a makeshift shelter made of pallets that is temporary, our plan was to put her in the corral with the sheep at night and stake her out during the day. There were sheep in the corral with the goats where she was.

We are giving her a bit of grain, trying to find a balance here. If we just give her grain,(or too much grain) she may not eat the weeds....

As for milking her in the future, well we are not set up for that, and it was not our original intention, we planned to resell her in the fall. But who knows? I have milked goats before when I was a preteen, so I can do it.

As for the cool water, our weather has been cool the last few days. Did not get much above 60 yesterday. It is the kids job to take fresh water to her several times a day.

I do think it is stress, and perhaps I can pick up Drench locally so I can give it to her sooner.

Since I originally posted, DH went out and took off the hobble. She seems a bit happier now.

Interesting fact about her, her mother and 5 other goats in the herd were killed by a bear when she was small.

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#5 Nytehunter

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 03:05 PM

You might also try a runner in the area you want eaten I much prefer them to chains I have one for my dog you can get a kit in the hardware store for dogs the only thing I added to the kit was 2 ratchet straps on each end of it to attach to the trees its easier on the trees less bark damage and way easier to cinch up then she would have lots more room to run and you can use light weight cable instead of heavy chain so she doenst have to drag the chain around. My german shepard needs a heavy chain but he loves his runner its 100 feet long with a 20 foot chain its a nice solution for a poor dog that came from a 40 acre farm to my 3/4 acre yard.
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#6 cowgirl8

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 03:22 PM

For her to be a happy goat, she must have a herd to belong to. Without a herd, she's(instinctively) a sitting duck. With time she'll gain confidence. As with dogs cows or horses, they will bond with humans, and then they become the herd.
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#7 Stephanie

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 05:41 PM

Awww.....she's cute! Her nose looks like she might have some Nubian in her, but you're right, she looks like a mix.

Sounds like you're working things out, I hope you can get that Drench. It's remarkable!

I think it's great that you were going to let her sleep with the sheep, but I'm thinking she's still going to be very upset during the day by herself, esp. since that's not how it was where she came from.

And the bear story....wow! ohmy.gif

#8 Rita

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 09:01 PM

She desperately needs a shelter to keep her out of the heat and rain. Also, any time a goat is "stressed", it is a good idea to worm them so they do not get vulnerable to cocci. I use Cydectin, but there are lots of different ones you can use.
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#9 CrabGrassAcres

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 09:55 PM

She need shade and a constant supply of fresh water. She needs a goat buddy. If you give her copper, she should not need worming. I just put the copper sulfate in the water. Buy it at a feedstore that sells pool supplies. No grain unless she is milking or close to kidding. She isn't likely to eat sagebrush very well, but will probably eat the tumble weed ok. She should have access to free choice good hay.
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#10 Rezgirl

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 07:38 AM

WOW so much great advice! Thank You!

She is doing much better. As of last evening she was on top of her temporary shed, looking all around, and was eating more. Did not seem to be moping around.

I suppose I will be looking for another goat for companionship.....sigh....one goat was a huge decision for us, and now two... ohmy.gif 24.gif Getting in deeper than I planned is so the story of my life.

CGA- She has picked at the sage brush some, but I don't really care if she doesn't eat that. If she eats tumble weed, well that would be fantastic. I am so allergic to Russian thistle, makes me miserable later in the summer.

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#11 westbrook

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 09:01 AM

CGA

copper has nothing to do with worms. A goat MUST be wormed! depending on where you live depends on how many times a year they are wormed. Copper is not a replacement for worming!

I not only use copper sulfate in their water but also offer a loose copper mineral freely as well as copper bolus. ... And... worm!

http://www.tennessee...deficiency.html

(not counting the silinium http://www.tennessee...deficiency.html )

Rezgirl

worms are in goats, can't get rid of them.. but you can control them. Any time a goat is moved it causes stress and the worms tend to multiply. It is best to go to your feed store and find out how many times a year they recommend worming and what they suggest you use.
Every area is different, every area worms differently. Goats eat off the ground..they can pick up anything.

http://www.tennessee...mingandvac.html

This goat looks like a Nubian x Alpine


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#12 vine

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 10:00 AM

I think she is very pretty. I don't know anything about caring for goats but I hope you find the balance you need for your new addition to your family. You are getting some great advice here from 'goat people'. She is still young so hopefully she will fit in once she gets familiar with everyone. Enjoy! cool.gif



#13 Crazy4Canning

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 12:13 PM

Awww. I know nothing about having goats as pets, except from what I've learned here.

I think she just needed a bit of love and catering. smile.gif It makes me happy to know that she's doing better.
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#14 CrabGrassAcres

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 09:29 PM

I've done fecals on my goats and the copper is doing an excellent job of keeping the worms knocked way down. They all look real healthy on it. I never use chemical wormers.

Might want to read Pat Coleby's book
"Have mercy on me, my God, have mercy on me, for in you I take refuge. I will take refuge in the shadow of your wings until the disaster has passed." Ps 57:1


"Look carefully then how you walk, not as unwise but as wise,making the best use of the time, because the days are evil. " Eph 5:15,16


"Do not be afraid because of the words that you have heard" 2 Kings 19:6
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#15 Rita

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Posted 13 June 2009 - 11:52 AM

Alot depends on your environment also. In my world, the worm load in the ground is huge. If the goats are eating from pasture, and you have alot of moisture, you goats will get worms. I have, and still do, give my goats copper, however, if I do not worm them, they will end up with a worm load and cocci.... I guess the best thing to do is to research, research, research and make your own decision.

http://www.saanendoah.com/copper1.html




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