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Ingenious idea for lighting in the Phillipines


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#1 CoM

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 07:33 AM

This probably wouldn't work for us but this is amazing.

http://www.wimp.com/lightenup/

#2 Jeepers

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 10:49 AM

That. Is. Amazing.

Thanks for the link.

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But if you try sometimes, you just might find

You get what you need.

 

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#3 Christy

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 12:23 PM

That's a fantastic low tech solution for light. Exactly what the people there need.
For those who would like a more 21st C approach, check out this link.
http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Light_tube
They've been around a few years, hollow tubes, lined with reflective material and sticking out of the roof to let light into the building.
People need natural daylight to function well. Blue light in the morning hours makes people more alert. So great find for those in the dark warren of little houses.
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#4 Violet

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 12:43 PM

I sent the link to my brother who is a missionary. They just got back from the Philippines. Hear he wants/planning to open a homeless shelter there.
I can, you can, too !

#5 sassenach

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 01:49 PM

this is great! Such a simple thing to do. Low tech but it works and thats the point. I am glad someone where they need such help figured out how to do it.

This is from Brazil :
http://greenupgrader...ng-alternative/

Edited by arby, 06 November 2011 - 01:55 PM.

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#6 Midnightmom

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Posted 07 November 2011 - 02:24 AM

I'm guessing that the bleach is to keep the water from growing algea or getting cloudy. What a wonderful idea for places that have enough sunlight for this to work. :bouquet:

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#7 Amishway Homesteaders

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Posted 07 November 2011 - 08:19 AM

Oh heck - Can't watch the video but got the jest of what is going on from what you all have said.
Also, I have seen the 'sun tubes' at work in a house set into the side of a hill. It did make the rooms 'look ike' there was sunlight coming in the windows - when if fact there were no windows being that part of the house was underground.

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#8 sassenach

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Posted 07 November 2011 - 02:39 PM

The one liter size bottle provided as much light as a 50watt bulb, AH, just so you know. It lit up the dark spaces well enough for average stuff being done, dispersing through the shed. I was thinking it would be great if you had to build a winter shelter with no windows. Original settlers had no windows in fact because of the glass tax or lack of glass windows in the first place. This would be very handy for lighting during the day so you could keep the door shut in winter time here!

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#9 Jeepers

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 03:20 AM

Arby, I thought the same thing about putting it in a shed. That would be a great source of light in a storage shed that has no electricity. Also, if you had one with no windows.

CoM, that video is so inspirational.

You can't always get what you want, babe

But if you try sometimes, you just might find

You get what you need.

 

~Mick and Keith~


#10 Amishway Homesteaders

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 06:29 AM

The one liter size bottle provided as much light as a 50watt bulb, AH, just so you know.


Thanks was wondering about that part of it?
I would worry about getting a good seal around the bottles - like for rain or snow?
:AmishMichael2:
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#11 Jeepers

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 08:07 AM


The one liter size bottle provided as much light as a 50watt bulb, AH, just so you know.


Thanks was wondering about that part of it?
I would worry about getting a good seal around the bottles - like for rain or snow?
:AmishMichael2:

They showed how he did that. His roof was made of corrugated tin. He cut a hole in his roof, took another small piece of the same material, drew a circle the size of the bottle, cut out the circle smaller than the bottle, then used tin snips to make cuts all around the inside of the circle, bent the little snipped areas up so they hugged the bottle. Then he placed the bottle...that is now inside the tin snipped extra piece of corrugated roofing...on top of his roof.

In other words, the bottle isn't in his roof directly, it's in an extra piece of roofing that sits on top of his existing roof and the bottle (that is suspended in the extra piece of roofing) hangs down into the house. Clear as mud? Sort of hard to explain.

This was in a very poor part of the Philippines so their roofs were basically just one piece of tin. Their homes are lean-tos built right up against each other so most of them had no windows. These bottle lights give some of them the only light they have in the house. All for a 2 liter bottle and some water.



Forgot to add, there was some type of sealing compound used along with the weight of the filled bottle.

Edited by Jeepers, 08 November 2011 - 08:15 AM.

You can't always get what you want, babe

But if you try sometimes, you just might find

You get what you need.

 

~Mick and Keith~


#12 Amishway Homesteaders

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 08:46 AM



The one liter size bottle provided as much light as a 50watt bulb, AH, just so you know.


Thanks was wondering about that part of it?
I would worry about getting a good seal around the bottles - like for rain or snow?
:AmishMichael2:

They showed how he did that. His roof was made of corrugated tin. He cut a hole in his roof, took another small piece of the same material, drew a circle the size of the bottle, cut out the circle smaller than the bottle, then used tin snips to make cuts all around the inside of the circle, bent the little snipped areas up so they hugged the bottle. Then he placed the bottle...that is now inside the tin snipped extra piece of corrugated roofing...on top of his roof.

In other words, the bottle isn't in his roof directly, it's in an extra piece of roofing that sits on top of his existing roof and the bottle (that is suspended in the extra piece of roofing) hangs down into the house. Clear as mud? Sort of hard to explain.

This was in a very poor part of the Philippines so their roofs were basically just one piece of tin. Their homes are lean-tos built right up against each other so most of them had no windows. These bottle lights give some of them the only light they have in the house. All for a 2 liter bottle and some water.



Forgot to add, there was some type of sealing compound used along with the weight of the filled bottle.


RIGHT?
That was my thinking, IF the bottle goes Through the roof, and with the sun heating up the water (explantion) How would you be able to keep a good seal? Also the weight of the water filled bottle would be 'pulling down ' all the time and this too would cause leaks?
It's a Good Idea, but If you were to do anything like this here a better seal needs to be put into place?
BUT STILL COOL!
:AmishMichael2:
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#13 CrabGrassAcres

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 05:11 PM

Synopsis:
Barios in the Phillipines. Many, many tiny homes crammed together with no windows at all. Tin roofs with no insulation or ceiling, just the metal. Apparently have electricity because talking about lowered electric bills with the lights. Over 100k have been installed, with goal of 1 million. Cut square from metal roof. Take larger square from another piece of metal and cut a hole in center that is 1inch or so smaller in diameter than the 2 liter bottle. Use tin snips to cut the edges of the hole and bend the flaps up. About 1 flap per 1/2 inch of the circumference. I didn't see them use sealant around the bottle. Homes are very rough, they showed walls of concrete block laid up just any old way at all. Bottle cap up when you put it thru the piece of metal. A capful of bleach added to the water. (Seems this would need to be replaced occasionally since the light will break down the bleach). Take the piece of metal (about 12x12 inch square) up on the roof with the bottle of water in it and fasten it over the small square hole you cut. They claim 50watt bulb worth of light with sun hitting it. Made a big difference they say in their power bills.
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#14 Mt_Rider

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 05:52 PM

The sealant was globbed onto the square patch of roofing but yeah, I'd seal around the bottle itself. Unless they wanted a water catchment too? ;)

I've just thot of how handy those would be in goat house/duck house/hay barn. All of mine have the same corrugated metal roofs. Silicone sealant would be easy around the bottle. Cutting that hole didn't look real easy, but doable.


I've found that like the old trick of setting a candle/oil lamp in front of a mirror for additional light reflection, a bottle of water magnifies a tiny light too. In this case, accidental discovery. My [recycled clear soda bottle] water bottle sitting in front of the red clock light. They are starting to make flashlights with this principle too.


MtRider [..tucking away one more tidbit of data :) ]

Edited by Mt_Rider, 08 November 2011 - 05:55 PM.

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#15 kappydell

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 06:01 PM

lets hear it for 3rd world ingenuity!! many of the best ideas come from those in 'less affluent' parts of the world as ingenious solutions that cost little or nothing are devised...ie how to make bleach using salt, water, and a bicycle; solar water distillation for purification; ceramic coolers; etc...now this lighting idea. i am IMPRESSED!



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