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Has anyone dehydrated collard greens?


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#1 sewandsew

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 11:58 PM

Was just wondering if anyone has dehydrated collard greens and if so, how.? Thanks.

#2 Virginia

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Posted 15 November 2011 - 09:27 AM

Good question. Other leafy things like herbs are, so why not greens, spinach, etc?
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#3 sewandsew

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Posted 15 November 2011 - 09:55 AM

And turnip greens and mustard greens?

#4 Jeepers

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Posted 15 November 2011 - 10:28 AM

I was thinking the same thing about kale.

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#5 themartianchick

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Posted 15 November 2011 - 10:44 AM

We've frozen them, but never dehydrated them... I wonder if they'd smell funny in the dehydrator? I grow collards for hubby but I don't eat them. The smell of them when they are cooking makes me really nauseous. Cabbage does, too!

#6 Canned Nerd

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Posted 15 November 2011 - 02:36 PM

I've dehydrated Kale, splashed with some lemon juice and garlic powder, to use as a great snack. I've also dehydrated Beet Greens which came out great. Collard Greens should dry just as good. You want something that has some substance to it so there is something left after drying.
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#7 Jeepers

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Posted 15 November 2011 - 05:24 PM

Good to know C.N. I was thinking about kale because my favorite soup (from Olive Garden) has kale in it and I found the recipe. Zuppa Toscana...drool.

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#8 Daylily

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Posted 15 November 2011 - 06:00 PM

I've dehydrated mustard greens, bok choy and kale. All are good. I have two kinds of kale, Dwarf Siberian and Dwarf Blue Scotch Curled. The later is delicious raw so I dry it raw. It makes a good crunchy treat. I cook the other greens until fairly well done, like I like to eat them. You don't have to put them out leaf by leaf; you can dry them in small clumps. They rehydrate well.

#9 sewandsew

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Posted 15 November 2011 - 08:18 PM

thanks. I'm gonna give them a try. Let you know how they turn out.

#10 furbabymom

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Posted 20 November 2011 - 11:52 PM

When you dry kale, do you lay the leaves out individually or can you stack them? I have five HUGE plants (I think they're called dinosaur kale" or something like that) in my garden and I need to do something with them!

#11 Daylily

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 07:30 AM

Furbabymom, The kale I dry raw has small leaves, smaller than the palm of my hand. I lay them out individually. The other type of kale with the large leaves, I chop and cook. Then I put it on the tray in loose, thin globs with space between the globs. I haven't tried stacking them. The bok choy doesn't dry as well as the kale in globs. It has to be spread out much thinner. Experiment with a stack of leaves and see if it drys well in a few hours or overnight.

#12 arby

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 10:30 AM

Thanks for the tips Daylily. I hope if I can garden next year if I get a place that permits it, the dwarf varieties you mentioned might be great for me to grow. I would love to have some dried greens I could just snack on or use in cooking.
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#13 furbabymom

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 12:54 PM

Thanks Daylily! I'll give it a try.

#14 MJ2

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 01:24 PM

This was my first year dehydrating collard greens. For several years I have dehydrated radish tops, mustard greens and kale. I love putting greens in my soup and these types of greens are so good in winter soups.



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