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Teneriffe Lace and *more*!


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#1 Cat

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 10:40 AM

Ebay had this auction on and I was intrigued... what is this stuff?

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I wanted to buy it, but I've spent way too much on that place already. :shakinghead: So I went looking for it on the internet...

A search for "Teneriffe lace" found a great site with the same book as on eBay as well as templates for making my own "makers". And she has knitting, and yarnmaking, and embroidery, small loom stuff like using the butterfly loom, kids crafts, and *LOTS* of stuff! FOR FREE! Online! :woohoo:


http://www.knitting-and.com/index.html

I apologize if somebody has posted about this place before. I'm not a knitter, so I might have missed it. :shrug:

Just wanted to share... :bighug2:


I *love* the internet!! :happy0203:

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#2 Amishway Homesteaders

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 12:38 PM

it was used by "none taters" for making lace tableclothes, dollies and other things for the home.
That would make a great winter project for you.
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#3 Trudy

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 10:50 PM

OK Michael, I will probably be sorry, but I'll bite: what is "none taters"? :shrug:



#4 Amishway Homesteaders

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 06:36 AM

can we say Spellcheck – it is Tatting! - Ask your Grandma....................
In the old days women made their own lace for their clothes as well as ALL those dollies for over the back of the couch and chairs in the living room , so when Dad put his head there (with all that greasy stuff they wore) she could take off the pretty dolly and wash it instead of the stain going into the fabric of the couch.
Tatting was also called 'Bobbin Lace' because you used a thing made of metal that had a bobbin in it, and you made small knots using it to make the lace. Think of the nets the fishermen used/ made in all those old movies?

Hope this helps?

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#5 Annarchy

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 07:40 AM

Only because I do both;

Bobbin lace is different from tatting.

Tatting is: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tatting

Tatting is a technique for handcrafting a particularly durable lace constructed by a series of knots and loops. Tatting can be used to make lace edging as well as doilies, collars, and other decorative pieces. The lace is formed by a pattern of rings and chains formed from a series of cow hitch, or half-hitch knots, called double stitches (ds), over a core thread. Gaps can be left between the stitches to form picots, which are used for practical construction as well as decorative effect.

Tatting dates to the early 19th century. The term for tatting in most European languages is derived from French frivolité, which refers to the purely decorative nature of the textiles produced by this technique. The technique was developed to imitate point lace.[1]


Bobbin lace is:

http://en.wikipedia....iki/Bobbin_lace

Bobbin lace is a lace textile made by braiding and twisting lengths of thread, which are wound on bobbins to manage them. As the work progresses, the weaving is held in place with pins set in a lace pillow, the placement of the pins usually determined by a pattern or pricking pinned on the pillow.

Bobbin lace is also known as pillow lace and bone lace, because early bobbins were made of bone[1] or ivory.

Bobbin lace is one of the two major categories of hand-made laces, the other being needlelace, derived from earlier cutwork and reticella.[2]



Yes, tatting utilizes a bobbin in the tatting shuttle on newer model shuttles. I have bone tatting shuttles without bobbins.

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#6 Annarchy

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 07:53 AM

Teneriffe lace is:

http://en.wikipedia..../Teneriffe_lace

Teneriffe lace is a needle lace from the island of Tenerife. Sometimes called Sol lace, sun lace, similar to a lace from South America called ñandutí (meaning spider web). In the 1930s - 1940s it was sometimes called Polka Spider Web Lace.

The lace is created by weaving thread on a ground of radial spoke threads, creating distinctive roundels. There are many different ways of making this type of lace. From using a pattern on a home made pillow form with pins to "The palma" and Taoro (early 1900s), As of 2005 you can get forms from vendors on the internet, also from "the posy bender". Daisy winders and bloom looms have also been used in constructing this type of lace. Teneriffe lace was used in conjunction with Battenberg tape lace at the turn of the 1900s.


Needle Lace is:

http://en.wikipedia....iki/Needle_lace

Needle lace (also known as needlelace or needle-made lace) is a type of lace created using a needle and thread to stitch up hundreds of small stitches to form the lace itself.

In its purest form the only equipment and materials used are a needle, thread and scissors. This form of lace making originated in Armenia where there is evidence of a lace making tradition dating back to the pre-Christian era. Turkish needlelace is also very popular around the world. This form however arose separately from what is usually termed needlelace and is generally referred to as knotted lace. Such lace is very durable and will not unravel if one or more loops are broken.

Beginning in the 17th century in Italy, a variety of styles developed where the work is started by securing heavier guiding threads onto a stiff background (such as thick paper) with stitches that can later be removed. The work is then built up using a variety of stitches - the most basic being a variety of buttonhole or blanket stitch. When the entire area is covered with the stitching, the stay-stitches are released and the lace comes away from the paper. See reticella.

Needle lace is also used to create the fillings or insertions in cutwork.



Several of my tatting books include instructions how to needle tat.


AH, did you mean, "non tatters", people who did not tat, instead they used a needle to create the lace?

Thank you, Cat for posting this. You reminded me of several projects on my ToDo list that I really need to get working on.

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#7 Trudy

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 10:30 PM

Sorry Michael, I didn't mean to sound like a smart mouth. I always enjoy your good humor, and thought you were making a joke that I didn't 'get'! I never did learn to tat, but my Mom tried to teach me. I wish now I had worked harder at learning. I have crocheted plenty of lace for pillow cases and scarves though. It is very pretty, but not as fine and delicate as tatted lace. Since I live on the Gulf coast, I know first hand about making crab nets and mullet nets. It is kinda like tatting- only bigger twine and shuttle, and it makes your fingers so sore! It makes me sad that it is fast becoming a lost art.

#8 Amishway Homesteaders

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Posted 24 April 2012 - 06:15 AM

Sorry Michael, I didn't mean to sound like a smart mouth. I always enjoy your good humor, and thought you were making a joke that I didn't 'get'! I never did learn to tat, but my Mom tried to teach me. I wish now I had worked harder at learning. I have crocheted plenty of lace for pillow cases and scarves though. It is very pretty, but not as fine and delicate as tatted lace. Since I live on the Gulf coast, I know first hand about making crab nets and mullet nets. It is kinda like tatting- only bigger twine and shuttle, and it makes your fingers so sore! It makes me sad that it is fast becoming a lost art.



No worries - was glad you saw it so I could change it.

= = =Funny = = = just the other day I was typing and wanted to say: Lori likes it when I cook!
But I hit some wrong keys and it posted : Lori likes it when I nook
AND I don't even have one of those! :sHa_sarcasticlol:
But I got a few comments about it from friends (seeing it was 'getting back to doing things the old ways') a cookbook on a nook would NOT be good? :sHa_sarcasticlol:
Spellcheck was never one of my strong points! Too much in a hurry to type and post - and even when I reread it I miss some. So most of the time if I am writing a story or something to go into the newspaper I have Lori spellcheck it for me. BUT I am NOT going up at 3 am to ask her to do that?

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