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Moving to our homestead soon!


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#1 Simplegirl

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 09:08 AM

Hi everyone! I don't post real often but had to share my excitement. DH and I bought a place with 9 acres last year. It has an old house which is basically no good at all, falling down. So we are buying a travel trailer to put on the property. Since it does get cold here over the winter, we need ideas for keeping warm this winter. We are going to build a roof over it and I am wondering how we might have that for warm weather and then enclose it for the winter and possible heat that with wood?

We have spent the last 6 months just cleaning up there. We have so much to do there still but can't seem to get anything done just on weekends. Living over there is a dream for both of us and while living in a travel trailer is not the perfect solution, we are trying to do it as inexpensively as possible.

#2 themartianchick

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 10:31 AM

Congratulations, SimpleGirl!

I've heard of people building a pole barn and then parking thetrailer inside it to cut down on the wind and cold. Once you are able to build a home, then the pole barn reverts back to being a barn. I always liked this idea, because then you might even be able to run plumbing, woodstove etc... into the barn and expand the living space a bit by using part of the barn to spread out in. It also makes for good storage for your preps and building supplies.

I've also heard of others placing bales of hay around the travel trailer to keep the wind from getting up under the vehicle. Will the heater in the trailer be enough to keep you warm?

What state will you be in? Is there a risk of tornadoes?That might give us a few more ideas to pass along to you.

#3 snapshotmiki

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 10:53 AM

Also putting up blankets in front of doors and windows. And wrap the water pipe coming up to the spigot outside. When we were in Cheyenne (too early one year) DH would remove the hose from the spigot to the trailer every night so it wouldn't freeze up. Then re-attatch in the morning, sometimes thawing the opening for the hose at the entry with my hair dryer.

As for the smallness of area, you'll get through it and be really thankful when you move into your house!!!!!

I really like the idea of the pole barn or even a prefab type building to use as a barn later. It would definitely cut the wind!
John 14:27 ...Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid.

A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone.
Henry David Thoreau

Job 13:15 Though He slay me, yet will I trust in Him...

Where are we going and why are we in a handbasket?!

Miki


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#4 sassenach

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 07:16 PM

Really happy for you. I know as many learn what your needs are regarding climate and such, that you will be able to figure out things.
If it is not too brutal winds and weather, even tarps firmly affixed to poles sunk in the ground can help a lot with maintaining a better immediate temperature basis for the trailer. but a more permanent structure like a barn /big shed certainly can be reused more substantially.

At the very least it creates a space around the trailer and shields it from view from looky loos while you work on projects and put your stuff out there.

It also sounds as if you may need a good locked shed for tools and machinery you will need to build with and do your landscaping and gardening chores with too.

I just saw where a friend on fb had come home and found her birdbath in the front yard gone. Some petty thief .... she laughed but that is mean to take something someone put the effort into buying, bringing home and setting up nicely as part of their yard and tools and such things as you will need to have around need to be secured or they will quite possibly be too easy pickings.

You will have many things and supplies that will be worth far more and you certainly had to go through securing and paying for and getting out there as you build, but if you can secure it or get it out of sight for the most part when not in use out on the land, that may increase your security and reduce such losses. out of sight, out of mind stuff may be helpful too.

I have seen shelters set up on framing and poles and lashed down securely and easily heated too when the weather is cold too and can be pretty easily taken down. but that is easiest in milder weather areas.


Good luck on creating a wonderful new home and lands for yourselves! Wonderful dream.

~~~~ Previously known as Arby . :americanflag:


#5 Jeepers

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 08:05 PM

No suggestions but I'm happy for you just the same!!!!! :darlenedance:

You can't always get what you want, babe

But if you try sometimes, you just might find

You get what you need.

 

~Mick and Keith~


#6 Simplegirl

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 08:19 PM

I didn't really go into much detail but we do have a garage and a shed that we can store things in and lock them up. So, we are good there. We are in mid-Missouri so sometimes get some pretty cold weather but of course this last winter was not cold hardly at all. I don't expect a repeat performance of that since we will be living in the travel trailer. We couldn't get that lucky! :)

#7 Motherhen

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 09:05 PM

I read this just recently---perhaps you can glean some pointers from this: http://www.thesurviv...travel-trailer/

Keep us posted on any tips that you might find that are helpful once you move in and experience it.

#8 sassenach

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 09:33 PM

Great to hear on the garage and shed, that sure helps. My dad and mom built the last home they owned but it had a foundation already. They were able to live in 600 feet of it and he used the garage for all the cutting and tool work as he built it up into a lovely 2400 sq ft. two story with a very steep roof.
In their retirement they travel with a fifth wheeler trailer.
LOL, he wants me to do the same thing. I say not really interested, not all the time. but they can be very handy temporarily. I have too many books and there is no place for a canner, Dad! lol.

AT this point can't afford either one but my dream is to get some acreage like that and build a cob structure home some day, build my own homestead. Maybe then I could afford a little teardrop trailer too. Best of both worlds.

I hope it all goes very smoothly for you.

Edited by arby, 25 April 2012 - 09:36 PM.

~~~~ Previously known as Arby . :americanflag:


#9 Simplegirl

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 08:41 AM

Thanks everyone! We are picking up the trailer on Saturday and will move in after my daughter gets married in June, so probably about July 1st. We talked some more last night and are going to look at the carports they have that they come out and put up for you, the metal ones. We are thinking we could enclose that with tarps or something similar during cold weather and then uncover it in the warm weather. We might be able to build it a little more cheaply, but maybe not too. And we have a LOT to do on the property this year so thinking having someone else put it up for us in ONE day would make a lot of sense. DH works 2 hours away and is really only able to work out there on the weekends.

Our goal is to get him out of his city job within 5 years and in doing the whole travel trailer thing for a couple of years we can save to build our house and have the place paid way down in that 5 year period. Then our expenses should be such that he could find a job closer to home that had a lower salary.

#10 sassenach

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 11:44 AM

What type of construction will you use to build your home? If you have never considered strawbale or cob construction, its a great way to save money and you can set up the plans to build it a section at a time. They are also more fireproof and you can use your imagination with functional art in them if you like. They are simple to plumb and add electrical to as well. Better in heating and cooling because they are not usually done rectangularly. The materials are natural as long as you make sure there have been no toxic spills in the dirt you get and the finishes and paints you use are also easy to make and not toxic.
You might be able to reduce how much you spend by quite a lot if you went that way.
cob is basically adobe like mud without making bricks. I know they are ok to build in Missouri rural areas already. It is nice to see they are also now being built even in the Northeast.

Most of it if one is in generally adequate health can be done pretty easily. Depending on climate and latitude there are adjustments, just like the differences between southern style chicken coops and northern style chicken coops or cabin styles, but if you like the idea it is worth studying and attending a regional seminar on cob building /strawbale construction and joining in to see if you would feel comfortable with it.

Shaping them differently than modern stick and plank style homes can make them much more durable as well to resist tornado weather although your roof may end up flying away, but the building it self is likely to withstand pretty serious tornadoes. That sounds alot better to me in such areas where they are frequent than building a stick based home where everything just gets blown to smithereens. :shrug:

~~~~ Previously known as Arby . :americanflag:


#11 Simplegirl

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 10:58 AM

That is interesting Arby although I have not seen any strawbale or cob construted homes in this area at all. Not sure where we might find a seminar around here but then again we haven't looked either. Amazing what is out there once you start looking.

We have not really decided about the house. We need to tear down and clear away the house that is there and inside of that is an OLD log cabin that we need to try to preserve if possible. We would like to incorporate it into the overall design of the house and surrounding yard. Not really making it a part of the house but rather possibly attaching with decking. Everything is really going to depend on what kind of condition it is in. Right now our best guess is that it might have been built in the mid 1800's and we know one wall is mostly missing where they attached it to the house (this was also the wall we think the fireplace would have been on. We understand it is common for those walls to be either missing or at the very least damaged). We will cross that bridge when we come to it.

#12 sassenach

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 11:51 AM

http://www.earthhandsandhouses.org/

http://www.greenhome...ing.com/cob.htm

http://housealive.org/

just a few sites I have found and enjoyed, some are also international.

Workshops are popping up all over the US. I know there are some in TX.

Most of the time, if you have a reasonable set of plans developed it is not a problem to local permitting.

There are some books that deal with code capable books when working with cob and strawbale home building too, but one just needs to do some searches. If I can remember more when I can get back to the subject, I can post more links .

I did go ahead and saved lots of cob building pics on this new laptop and can post a few of those.

I grew up in Southern California and with the Spanish influence and history there and learning about adobe homes from that period and actually staying in one on the weekends when I was 12, at the home of some dear family friends my dad was helping making a documentary film back in the early 70's, 72-73, I really enjoyed it and yes, the hippie natural movement influences my artistic stuff at times.

but I think you can do them very tastefully and utilize how it works to make it quite lovely and useful at the same time .

cob has been used for centuries and there is still one building being lived in and used in Yemen that is 10 stories high, completely made with cob. Cob was used in the UK up into the 1900's as well. Its quite a widespread thing!

with a metal roof it is virtually fire proof and insurance companies really like that.

I hope you can fix up that old cabin.

I used to sometimes camp in one probably similar time frame when it was built when I backpacked during high school years in the back country of Santa Barbara.

We helped maintain it.

Have seen many cabins in the NC western area too later on ....



these are two books and I probably have at least one on kindle , but these are hardcopies::


Home Work Handbuilt shelters by Lloyd Kahn

The Hand-Sculpted House
A practical and Philosophical Guide to Building A Cob Cottage
by Ianto Evans, Michael G. Smith, Linda Smiley
they are well experienced and did a fine job describing how it is all done for the average person.

The second book was the most informative more specifically for cob construction and I really am glad I got it! Sort of like a bible about cob homes! They are still prevalent in the matter today, maybe more than 30 years experience now?

~~~~ Previously known as Arby . :americanflag:




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