Jump to content


Photo

Hens fighting


13 replies to this topic

#1 inkskin

inkskin

    Still thinking about it...

  • Users2
  • 31 posts

Posted 14 September 2004 - 10:00 PM

I found one of my hens with a bloody head last week. I thought maybe the rooster did it. I put her in a large cage to let her head heal. Tonight I let her out of the cage since her head had cleared up. When I turned around I realized that one of the hens was fighting her. I had to take a second look because it looked like two roosters fighting but I know they're not because they lay eggs. :-) So what's up with that?
Blessings,
Georgene

#2 Guest_Guest_*

Guest_Guest_*
  • Guests

Posted 14 September 2004 - 10:31 PM

Now you know why people coined the term "henpecked". ).

Separate her out again until she's completely healed, and watch her after she's released to see if the hen gets after her again. Sometimes I could create a bit more peace by chasing the hen off a few times, but it's hard if they're penned.

Are they penned up or run free? Can she get away from the nasty hen?

Roosters usually pull the feathers of the back of the neck pretty badly, but I've never had one peck at a hen. In my experience, only other hens pecked at hens (as adults). Roosters fight roosters, but "ride" the hens roughly sometimes.

Sorry, georgene. It's hard to make animals "play nice".

Cat

#3 Guest_Guest_*

Guest_Guest_*
  • Guests

Posted 15 September 2004 - 12:19 AM

they were astablishing a pecking order ,,,there is the first hen and she gets to pick on all hens and # 2 does the same but does not get to pick on hen #1 and so on that is what is going on......it is a pecking order and if some one does not follow where they arre suppose to be they can get the snot kicked out of them by all the hens and roosters.....all animals have the pecking order...take care and keep the faith

#4 Guest_Guest_*

Guest_Guest_*
  • Guests

Posted 15 September 2004 - 01:06 PM

yes there is a pecking order..what is happening is they fight each other to find the weakest one...that one will be your setter. She will not get picked on if she just goes and hides...she will go to the nest in a quiet dark place if you have one...if not, quick build one! as long as she is there she will not have any trouble. If she gets off she will be chased back in.

Sometimes it is best not to intervene but to let nature take its course. All you can do it to provide as close as you can to a chickens natural environment...in this case a quiet dark place with a nice grass filled box. Because I free range my chickens, I like to use old tires. Usually they nest under a bush or in a lone place. I place a board on the ground to keep snakes and burrowing varmints from comming up and stuffed with soil and straw..this is just enough room for one hen.



#5 inkskin

inkskin

    Still thinking about it...

  • Users2
  • 31 posts

Posted 24 September 2004 - 02:54 AM

I let my hen out and she seemed to be doing fine. I went back the next day and she was a bloody mess again so back in the cage she went. I remember last year these two hens did the same thing. I'm going to find a good home for one of them. I just can't figure out what these two have it in for each other. They were from the same batch of chicks.

They are in a very large area.

Thanks for the help!
Georgene

#6 Nelda

Nelda

    Still thinking about it...

  • Users2
  • 68 posts

Posted 03 October 2004 - 03:19 PM

Pecking order problems... I suppose you've got a heavy-breed such as Rhode islands, or australorps?

Well, there's a few things you can try, number one is seperation (however another hen will become low man on the totem pole, and may be brutalised for the sake of her attacker's status) This can work quite well, especially if you want to add to your flock, as you can pick up some pullets to add to a second coup and yard that will invariably become subordinate to the formerly low hen on the pole.

You can try clipping the agressor's beaks, I haven't done that, because the aggressors are usually really good layers, and tend to keep the rest of your flock in line.

If you're not interested in clipping, try culling! The weather *is* changing, and Chicken & dumplings is quite a tasty dish on those cold fall evenings.

I prefer to seperate, and add to the flock. You'll be able to try out different combinations of layer & grains & forage to find the best mix for laying, all the while maintaining a control group (your original flock) that will keep you fryin' eggs until you've prooved a different regimen to be better.

Dad


"A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently and die gallantly. Specialization is for insects." Robert Heinlein.

#7 Guest_Guest_*

Guest_Guest_*
  • Guests

Posted 03 October 2004 - 05:07 PM

uh oh...

Hey girls

#8 Nelda

Nelda

    Still thinking about it...

  • Users2
  • 68 posts

Posted 03 October 2004 - 11:06 PM

That's right, west... and you need to clean that room right now, young lady! as if I don't say that enough with four daughters... oof.

Dad

#9 Guest_Guest_*

Guest_Guest_*
  • Guests

Posted 03 October 2004 - 11:28 PM

All RIGHT!!!

Someone to keep Westie in line!!! )

#10 Nelda

Nelda

    Still thinking about it...

  • Users2
  • 68 posts

Posted 04 October 2004 - 08:24 PM

Thanks for the welcome... My wife and I will be reading and posting under My4Girls... you'll know who it is by either ~Mom or ~Dad at the bottom of the post. I used to be pretty active in misc.survivalism a long time ago, then it got a bit too conspiratorial.

Alas, I've read through a few threads and found this to be a forum that suits our country-living lifestyle... just so's you all have a bit of background on us....

We live in NW Washington State, on a small island. We've got four lovely girls ages 18mos to 9 years, a dozen chickens (Rhodies, Wynadotes, Orpingtons, and a New Hampshire) five runner ducks, a Golden Retriever and a

And no, I don't plan on putting anyone in line... I'll just offer help when I can, and ask questions when I'm stumped.

Anyhow, Regards


Dad



#11 inkskin

inkskin

    Still thinking about it...

  • Users2
  • 31 posts

Posted 12 October 2004 - 01:25 AM

Thanks for the advice everyone.

I'm wondering how much cider vinegar I would put in a bucket of water?

Well, the hen healed and I let her out. I've checked on her for a few days and there seems to be no fighting.

Another weird thing is that we are getting hardly any eggs this past month and when the hens do lay by the time we go get the eggs (we gather them daily), we find the top of the shell has been pecked so we can't use the egg. What would cause this?

I thought maybe they need calcium so I started throwing them oyster shell but the pecking still hasn't stopped. Is this behavior something that happens when they moult? (sp?)
Georgene

#12 Guest_Guest_*

Guest_Guest_*
  • Guests

Posted 12 October 2004 - 06:48 AM

I used to add about a quarter cup of vinegar for a gallon of water.

Oyster shell is supposed to help with keeping hard shells on the eggs they lay, but I don't know about keeping the hens from pecking eggs.

Or it could just be that the shorter days are having an effect on the laying. They tend to slow down egg production in the fall and winter. That's why some people put a light in the hen house (on a timer or not).

Hopefully "Henrietta" has learned to avoid the meanie.

Cat

#13 Nelda

Nelda

    Still thinking about it...

  • Users2
  • 68 posts

Posted 12 October 2004 - 01:32 PM

We had a problem with the hens egg eating. I read that you could put a curtain over the nest boxes, keeping the bottom loose enough to move about a bit. The curtain is supposed to deter the chickens from going into the boxes except to lay eggs. I did try it and it did work on a most of them. The hens that kept at it, the trouble makers - no offense but we ate them. I have no use for hens that eat the eggs. Since the days are getting shorter, you might want to give your hens the winter off from laying. If there are no eggs to eat then no problem for now. Then in the spring when they start up again, see which hens are still a problem and cull them out. You might want to switch to a lower protein content feed, like all purpose poultry, it will help slow down the laying if you want to go that route. Love to stay and chat but I've got laundry to do - DH needs clean jeans as he is always last in line when it comes to the wash - Love, MOM

#14 inkskin

inkskin

    Still thinking about it...

  • Users2
  • 31 posts

Posted 07 November 2004 - 12:47 AM

What does the vinegar do?

Hugs,
Grammy



Reply to this topic



  

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users